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County candidate endorsements: Mason and Gallowich

Picking a candidate to endorse in a local election is rarely easy. Those who step up in this county and throw themselves into the public arena have always, as far as I know, had the public interest at heart. This fall is no exception and we can be thankful for that. Normally citizens in this county choose moderate politicians to represent them regardless of party affiliation as we look for steady leadership that protects our quality of life and unique rural and resort attributes. That will be the case again this year, as neither commissioner candidate is radical or fringe.

The District 3 county commissioner seat pits Roland Mason against Bob Schutt. Roland has been active in local politics. He spent eight years on the Crested Butte Town Council and has served on various public boards, including the Mountain Express and RTA. Bob touts his extensive private business experience as being a more valuable asset for the commissioner job. While Bob is generally more conservative than Roland, the two actually agree on many broad issues. Both say workforce housing is critical, economic development is a need, and protecting public lands is important.

The primary difference between candidates in this race might be temperament. At Sunday’s Crested Butte News Candidate’s Forum, Bob was more aggressive than Roland and tried to ruffle his feathers. Roland for the most part didn’t bite. As a reporter who has covered him on his public boards, that’s Roland’s typical style. He doesn’t ruffle easily and I don’t think I have ever seen him lose his temper. Roland is not a guy who will go off on a rant very often, if at all.

I’ve met with Bob several times and he isn’t afraid to state his views. I don’t see him throwing a rant either. He is smart and has volunteered his time to many local causes. He wants to be involved and from all accounts is sincerely community-minded.

Bob has shown he likes to raise questions and will not be afraid to confront his fellow commissioners and staff over things like the budget, salary structure, and ancillary boards like the Tourism Association and RTA. But to what purpose? Will he have potential solutions to the issues he raises?

At Sunday’s forum, Bob criticized Roland’s work on the RTA board and said he thinks the local air program isn’t effective and wants the RTA to focus on cheaper airline tickets out of Gunnison for locals. That’s a catchy campaign issue but not how the real world works. Roland explained the relationship United Airlines has with the smallest airport they regularly serve in the world—that’s us at the Gunnison Airport. Bob has stated he doesn’t like the county manager’s salary, especially when compared to the same job in other counties. What is an appropriate Gunnison county manager salary and skill set?

On the affordable housing issue, Bob said Sunday that such housing has to be spread out across the county—a good general concept most people certainly agree with. And then Roland schooled him that in fact there were many active projects and initiatives happening all over the county at the moment, from Mt. Crested Butte to Crested Butte, to Buckhorn Ranch, to Crested Butte South to Gunnison. Roland’s one knuckle tap to Bob at the forum was that Bob would know about those projects if he attended the meetings.

If campaigning is an indication of how much work a candidate will put it into the job if elected, Roland wins that part of the contest. When asked, Bob said he had been to “several” county commissioner meetings since announcing his candidacy. By all accounts he has been to “some.” Roland has been to most. As a guy who attends a lot of meetings, believe me, they aren’t usually great entertainment. But it is where government stuff happens and the basis for decisions are made in dreary meetings where data is analyzed and alternatives explored. It is where effective politicians have to show up for the grind of the job. Roland has been to Crested Butte and Mt. Crested Butte council meetings lately as well. I know Roland has sat down with the county manager and asked for information on various county departments and strategic planning. Bob hasn’t. That is another example of the behind the scenes job grind.

Of course, in my mind it is just as important to be out and about giving constituents a chance to engage with the elected representatives. I haven’t seen either sitting on an Elk Avenue bench lately but trust that both can find a way to make themselves available to the citizens if elected. But the behind the scenes work is being done by Roland much more than by Bob.

Look, Roland as county commissioner isn’t going to change the world at the county level. He will not lead raucous rallies. That is not how he works. He is deliberate and methodical and not one to pop off. He’ll grind. He is not the candidate of change but he will vote for what he thinks is best and not just follow what his fellow commissioners want. His growing family and business will keep him busy and that might take away from the commissioner job that has gotten a lot more involved recently, so he’ll have to adjust. Bob might veer away from the path of the current county commissioners and pop off more and I can actually appreciate that in a representative if he does it with purpose. But he has to really get to know the depth of the issues before doing so—otherwise it’s just bang and not much buck. Given the local political experience and work I’ve seen put into the campaign, I’ll be voting for Roland this go around.

On the sheriff’s side, there is demeanor as well. Mark Mykol’s forte is probably not public debates and forums. I’ve chatted with him one-on-one and he is more comfortable in that situation than on stage under the spotlight. Understandable. John Gallowich probably came across as the most competent candidate of the four on stage Sunday at the forum. But I was impressed with Mykol when several people went directly at him, calling him out over a number of personnel and personal issues, and he handled it calmly and without anger. Kudos to Mykol for that.

But for the north end of the valley, the law enforcement coverage and whether to continue with Mt. Crested Butte is a major issue. Mykol wants to follow the path he said was laid out by county administrators and the current sheriff and not continue with the Mt. Crested Butte contract to provide law enforcement coverage up here. Gallowich says he will reverse the current course and keep Mt. Crested Butte involved. Gallowich is on the right side of the controversy.

The right answer seems to me that the current contract between the county sheriff’s department and town of Mt. Crested Butte should be extended, the price tag adjusted to cover more town costs, but the authority of the sheriff defined more clearly so that the sheriff is undoubtedly the ultimate law enforcement authority up here as he or she is in the rest of the county. From what I’ve heard, the communication between the sheriff’s department and Mt. Crested Butte has been pretty weak. That needs to change and could be the difference that results in the ultimate win-win situation. I think Gallowich has the ability to facilitate that change. Heck, a weekly coffee and donut meeting between the sheriff and Mt. Crested Butte police chief looking back at the previous week and looking forward to the coming week could be all it takes. The issue of abnormally high turnover in the sheriff’s department is a topic that Gallowich seems to be more concerned with than Mykol and wants to rectify. That too is legitimate and a plus in John’s favor.

Both men have ideas on how to lead the department. Both are qualified law enforcement officers. But Gallowich wants to make changes in the department to bring it up a notch. The north valley coverage is an important issue. It can be addressed with better communication instead of a complete overhaul. Gallowich favors that path while emphasizing he wants to be the sheriff for the entire county, and that’s reason to vote for John to be the next Gunnison County sheriff.

Ballots are due back to the county clerk’s office by Tuesday, November 6. The elections office recommends that since the ballot is large, you use two stamps to mail back your ballot—or better yet, drop it off in person at one of the polling places.

—Mark Reaman

Meet the Candidates: October 19, 2018

Roland Mason

District 3 county commissioner candidate

There is a perception by some that you will be so busy with a young family and your business that you will not have the time for the commissioner work and be overshadowed by the current board members, Jonathan Houck and John Messner—and too often simply fall in line with their positions. Are these valid issues? 

Absolutely not! I understand the commissioner position is a full-time job and I will work for the county electorate on a full-time basis. I believe raising a young family, owning a business, and working every day to support that family are strengths as a commissioner. It shows connectivity to the community and the tangible reasons I am dedicated to guiding Gunnison County into the future. The decisions I make as commissioner will affect my family and business right alongside the rest of the business owners and workers in our county.

As for being overshadowed by the current commissioners, I fully disagree. If anything, I will bring a unique voice to the current board. As a lifelong resident and business owner, I am connected to both Gunnison and Crested Butte. I have a deep understanding of the issues and will always make my decisions based off of what is best for our county as a whole. Will there be times I agree with the other commissioners? Yes. Will there be times we disagree? Absolutely. The ability to create honest working relationships through collaboration is what really matters. Those are the principles on which my business is founded and that is the mindset that led to eight successful years on Crested Butte Town Council. Collaboration is much different from “simply falling in line.”

You are both running under the banner of a political party. How tied are you to the local, state and national positions (and the local people) in those parties? 

I am a moderate Democrat. I received support from the Democratic Party, but party affiliation does not define my decision-making. I initially became involved in politics because of specific issues that were presented to our community at the time. I like local politics because the decisions made will directly affect the people in our community. One’s party affiliation is also much less important than the issues at hand and the individual elected. I believe local elected officials must be trusted members of the community, who are available to the people they represent and transparent in their decision making process. I will approach all issues through the lens of preserving our values and common-sense decision making.

Are you comfortable with the county salary structures?

Yes. I believe our current salary structure is competitive in the state of Colorado. It is important to retain qualified staff and attract new experienced employees when jobs become available. I believe in paying for qualified leadership. That leadership sets the tone for the success of each department, which in turn leads to an efficient and well run government.

Were you comfortable with the outcome of the Gunnison County Sheriff’s Office and Gunnison County settling a lawsuit with a former employee (Scott Jackson) for hundreds of thousands of dollars? How would you ensure that type of situation doesn’t arise again?

As a community member, I am never “comfortable” when tax dollars are spent in litigation. From the information I have on the matter, I believe this lawsuit sheds light on the problems within the current Sheriff’s Department and its administration. It is up to the voters to ensure a new leadership is put in place. Electing John Gallowich will ensure that type of situation does not happen again.

Favorite drink? 

Arnold Palmer with the occasional John Daily.

Do you prefer Hannity, Maddow or Cooper?

I don’t spend a lot of time listening to the talking heads on cable TV. I use MetRec’s digital TV for local news and sports. Netflix is my main source for entertainment programming. I love our local papers and value their unique voices. For state and national news, I rely on a few news feeds that include the Denver Post, the Washington Post, the Wall St. Journal, and a variety of others.

Last good book you read?

The Rise of the Naked Economy by Jeremy Neuner.

 

Bob Schutt

District 3 county commissioner candidate

There is a perception by some that you are a smart but relatively new and well-off resident to the valley that doesn’t understand some of the nuances of the community and how to best accomplish things in a sometime fractious environment. Also, can you relate to and speak to the blue collars in the community? Are these valid issues?

Am I “homegrown” in the Gunnison Valley? No. Am I “new” to the Gunnison Valley? Absolutely not! I have strong family ties to Gunnison County. My great uncle was Gunnison County Clerk and Recorder in 1896 until his death. My father-in-law taught in Crested Butte at the Smith Ranch Law Science Academy during the 1950s. I have been in Colorado since the mid 1960s and have continuously owned the home in Crested Butte I currently live in since 1985, far longer than my opponent has owned a home in the Gunnison Valley. Admittedly, I was not born here, and I am at a loss to understand what relevant experience for this position would have come in that period from birth through high school. As in much of Colorado, not many locals here are life-long residents. Gunnison County is my home and only home.

Do I understand the nuances of the community? As a land and homeowner in Gunnison County for over 30 years, I have worked with and continually encounter some of the nuances of the community. It is not a fractious environment if you treat everyone equally and fairly. I have successfully lived and worked all over the world learning broadly based approaches and solutions to problems and management of a business which I bring as my experience to Gunnison County. Being a member of Rotary and serving on the board of trustees of the Gunnison Valley Hospital board, I have an appreciation for the desires and needs of all citizens of the community

Can I relate to blue collar workers? I consider “blue collar” an outdated and stereotypic term. I do not use it myself. As a practicing physician, I treated all individuals equally without regard to their race, gender, or social economic background. I continue to work several times each year taking care of indigent patients in Central America. My ancestors were Holland Dutch immigrants to upstate New York. My wife’s family were Irish immigrants to Long Island, New York. My parents could not afford to send me to college, so I accepted an appointment to the U. S. Air Force Academy. I became the first member of my family to earn a college degree. This resulted in my serving in Vietnam and using the GI Bill to attend medical school. I am, indeed, fortunate to now enjoy “financial security” but believe it has, in a large part, resulted from hard work and dedication. This same financial security allows me to treat the county commissioner position as public service, my only job.

You are both running under the banner of a political party. How tied are you to the local, state and national positions (and the local people) in those parties?

Parties have no place in a local election!!! Notably, many residents have signs in their yards representing candidates nominated by different parties. You should vote for the best qualified candidate as your representative. As your county commissioner, I always first consider the best interest of our county residents, regardless of how others might try to politicize me or issues. I am not obligated to follow any local, state, or national party positions. I am appalled by the partisanship of our senators and representatives paralyzing and creating a dysfunctional form of government and gridlock. If you want to know how I stand on an issue, just ask me. Don’t expect me to support the party line. On social and environmental issues, I am considered by some as quite liberal. I care about people, renewable energy, and preserving nature and wildlife. On financial issues, I am more conservative. With my business experience, as well as training in advanced management courses at Kellogg School of Business and Harvard School of Business, I know how to manage our county financial resources. I believe the county can to do well financially if we spend our money prudently. I usually support tax increases for essential services but rarely for special interest “tax and spend” programs. I am not a rubber stamp for anyone.

Are you comfortable with the county salary structures?

No! As an elected commissioner, I will do a serious review of county salaries and positions. The county administration salaries are higher than any adjacent county or nearby resort county, all having a larger population base. I will spend the County’s money like I spend my own money. Very, Very, carefully.

Were you comfortable with the outcome of the Gunnison County Sheriff’s Office and Gunnison County settling a lawsuit with a former employee (Scott Jackson) for hundreds of thousands of dollars? How would you ensure that type of situation doesn’t arise again?

Bob Schutt

Of course not! First of all, the election this year could present a situation similar to the Jackson lawsuit. Should Mr. Gallowich win, and Mr. Mykol continue as undersheriff having previously run against Mr. Gallowich for sheriff, potential conflict may occur. I will make every effort to lead the county away from the adverse financial situation created by the “type of Jackson situation” referred to as well as any other similar situations. I cannot guarantee that type of situation will not occur again. Unfortunately, our society has become quite litigious. My observation of our present legal system is that it frequently results in no winners. The system is an incredibly expensive, acrimonious, and an uncertain way to resolve a dispute. I will support all efforts to make sure county officials and staff get the necessary and important human resources training to better ensure we are not discriminating against anyone. I will be very proactive to make sure there is not a repeat of a “Jackson type” incident.

Favorite drink?

Water! It is healthy, necessary for life, and the best thirst quencher.

Do you prefer Hannity, Maddow or Cooper?

I strongly believe in the freedom of the press and free speech. It is difficult for me to understand how our major news networks, magazines, and newspapers have become so partisan. It is extremely disruptive to our government and way of life. That being said, I am an independent thinker and take away what I believe is being reported in a fair and unbiased way. Yesterday I listened to both Anderson Cooper 360 and Sean Hannity. Both had segments I enjoyed. I rarely turn on MSNBC with Rachel Maddow.

Last good book you read?

The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto, a novel by Mitch Albom. Spanish war orphan born in a burning church and raised by a blind guitar teacher, Frankie Presto was gifted with extraordinary musical abilities that shape not only his life but the lives of those around him. A delightful and easy read for those that love music.

 

John Gallowich

County sheriff

Turnover in the Sheriff’s Office seems to be an issue at the moment. Is it valid? What will you do as leader of the county Sheriff’s Office to build a team that stays in the county and gains experience within the department?

This is absolutely a valid issue. Currently the turnover rate is so high that the Sheriffs Office can no longer properly staff the Patrol Division. The Sheriff’s Office 2018 budget has allocated 12 patrol deputies. At this time at least three of our deputies have less than six months on the road and the office is advertising to hire four replacement patrol deputies. This simply tells us that out of the 12 positions only five patrol deputies have six months or more experience with Gunnison County Sheriff’s Office.

With the current rate of turnover, we will not be able to provide the level of service and protection that the citizens of Gunnison County deserve. In all my years of law enforcement, I have never seen or heard of such a high turnover rate. This has a very negative affect on the citizens of our county. From a fiscal standpoint we are putting money into a broken system, continually paying for a hiring process and the training of new deputies only to fire them or watch them leave.

I disagree with the administration stating that the turnover is chiefly due to salaries. The Sheriff’s Office is competitive with the other three law enforcement agencies in this county including Gunnison P.D., Crested Butte M.O., and Mt Crested Butte Police Department. I would refer to the Gunnison County leadership manual: (Study after study shows that people leave because of their direct supervisors, more so than any other reason). The sheriff’s policy requires 18 months’ experience before being assigned as a training officer. We have deputies with nine months serving as a training officer. This is clearly not a healthy training program. The current administration believes, as documented in the Gunnison Country Times, that turnover helps improve our hiring process. This is an opportunity that I don’t believe we need; let’s hire them, train then and keep them. Due to the turnover rate, the Sheriff’s Office clearly has the lowest level of experience in the patrol divisions of all agencies in the valley.

When I become sheriff, I will evaluate every deputy and place them in a position that will best suit their abilities and the needs of the department. I will try to hire from local applicants who already know and are vested in the community; men and women who want the kind of lifestyle that our county has to offer. I will create a stable, respectful work environment for all patrol deputies, detention deputies and anyone employed at the Sheriff’s Office.

Give me an example of how you would advise deputies to handle a community policing situation in the north end of the valley that may not be standard protocol in other places.

Community policing should be an intricate part of the Sheriff’s Office service to the citizens. Proactive patrolling in the county and positive, friendly interaction with the public will foster trust. Just driving through an area and not stopping to talk to people is not enough. We need to let our citizens know that we are interested in their concerns. Children need to know that deputies are not to be feared but are there to help and protect them. When our deputies are vested in our communities, their concern will show. I will expect this interaction not only in the north end of the valley but throughout the county. When the Sheriff’s Office is understaffed, reactive patrolling is the result. By stabilizing the turnover rate, we should be fully staffed with well-trained deputies to do the proactive patrolling that our citizens deserve.

Were you comfortable with the outcome of the Sheriff’s Office and Gunnison County settling a lawsuit with a former employee (Scott Jackson) for hundreds of thousands of dollars? How would you ensure that type of situation doesn’t arise again? 

I am not comfortable that our county was sued for violating the First Amendment rights of an employee. One would think that the Sheriff’s Office and county settled this lawsuit for such a large amount (in excess of $400,000) to avoid a possible larger payout.

I will ensure this type of situation will not arise again in my administration because neither I nor my deputies will violate people’s constitutional rights.

Favorite book?

Whatever book my grandson wants me to read to him.

Favorite place to take your wife or family to dinner?

We like to mix it up—whatever we are in the mood for.

 

Mark Mykol

County sheriff

Turnover in the Sheriff’s Office seems to be an issue at the moment. Is it valid? What will you do as leader of the county Sheriff’s Office to build a team that stays in the county and gains experience within the department?

Turnover is a statewide and national issue throughout law enforcement agencies. It seems to be an issue here likely because it is campaign season. Turnover happens, not only in law enforcement, but construction, dispatch, retail, small business, the university, pretty much everywhere. It is not isolated to our area.

There are numerous factors that contribute to turnover: bad hiring practices from prior administrations, hiring officers looking for a department to help launch their career, some find that the career is not a fit for them, one employee had extreme policy violations, another moved closer to family, sometimes character and integrity is not high enough to be part of our team, etc. The list goes on and on.

Turnover creates opportunities for both parties involved. For every officer that has moved on, we have the opportunity to replace them with a better qualified officer.

We are already reaping the benefits of these hires, and the next administration will too.

Turnover also helps us improve our hiring processes. We are already addressing how we hire. Looking for officers that are anchored in our community, mature, have a passion for law enforcement. Look for red flags earlier. Involve our current officers in the hiring. Applicants shadow officers and ride along with them. Score prospects on their attitude, involvement, and enthusiasm. Hire only the best that have high standards of character and integrity. Conduct an extensive background review. Conducting behavioral-based interviews, realistic job previews, employee recognition, and team building exercises.

Another plus out of the turnover issue is that as leaders we have been receiving training in the most current, cutting edge leadership styles targeting the turnover issue.

Give me an example of how you would advise deputies to handle a community policing situation in the north end of the valley that may not be standard protocol in other places.

The North Valley is still part of Gunnison County. I do not recognize a division, we are all one.

Every situation, regardless where it is located, is given the same consideration. Every part of the county is equal in the eyes of the Sheriff’s Office.

Were you comfortable with the outcome of the Sheriff’s Office and Gunnison County settling a lawsuit with a former employee (Scott Jackson) for hundreds of thousands of dollars? How would you ensure that type of situation doesn’t arise again?

The outcome is done and gone and I am able to move forward. Being called upon as a witness, I will not be able to go into specifics regarding the case.

Our nation has seen lawsuits on the rise for quite some time. The Sheriff’s Office has a great team of county attorneys to assist us with advice regarding any concerns. Our office walks a straight line. Our hiring practices have changed and only individuals with a high level of integrity and character get an opportunity to be part of our team.

Favorite book?

Besides the Bible, it would be Candidate Survival 101.

Favorite place to take your wife or family for dinner? 

Fried chicken on the boat at the reservoir.

An interview with new CBMR VP and General Manager Tim Baker

Taking some time to assess Crested Butte

by Mark Reaman

The view from the general manager’s office at Crested Butte Mountain Resort in the Axtel Building is pretty good. It looks directly out onto the ski hill beneath the peak at the base of the Silver Queen and new CBMR vice president and general manager Tim Baker said he wasted little time in showing off his office view to his friends and family back in Beaver Creek when he reported for his new job last week.

The sale of CBMR from the Mueller family to Vail Resorts closed September 27, and the new company appointed Baker the vice president and new general manager of CBMR. He comes most recently from Beaver Creek, where he was senior director of resort operations at Beaver Creek Resort. Baker has been with Vail Resorts since 2007 in a variety of roles across Keystone, Breckenridge and Beaver Creek.

The purpose of this interview was not to delve into the hard news issues of Vail Resorts but give Baker a chance to introduce himself personally to the community. We’ll have plenty of time in the future to find out what he and the company think of Brush Creek, snow banks or Vinotok.

I sat down with Baker and Erica Mueller, now a community liaison consultant for CBMR, in Baker’s office on Monday as a snow/rain mix tried to paint the front of the mountain an early-season white. Baker said he had been to Crested Butte previously to recreate but now he was taking the reins of an iconic ski mountain and resort.

CBN: Have you had a chance to do more than work since you arrived?

TB: I have not been able to do much other than work this trip. My focus initially is to get to know everyone. I want to meet the people and understand their perspectives, the culture, what this destination means to everyone. That’s my primary focus right now. I’ll have plenty of opportunity to ride my bike on an individual basis down the road.

CBN: From the job situation, how do you view this place as opposed to being here on vacation?

TB: What’s so amazing about Crested Butte is how distinct it is. There are so many unique attributes, from what it looks like, the type of people who are here, the passion that people have. This is a very proud destination and a very proud community. It really struck me how passionate the people are and the responsibility we have to celebrate what Crested Butte is.

CBN: So what do you think Crested Butte is?

TB: I see it as being a bit rugged. A bit passionate is the word that stuck in my mind a lot of the time that I’ve been here. People care. They care about one another. They care about the environment. People care about the type of experience that they are having and that their children and families are having. And then ultimately what the destination visitors have when they’re here. There’s a certain expectation of a Crested Butte type of experience and over time I’m going to figure out what that is. Being this short in the tenure I can’t sit here and say I yet know what it is. My intention in the short term is to get out and meet people and find out what that Crested Butte experience is.

CBN: Do you have a goal down the line of what you want the outside visitor to think of when they hear the name Crested Butte?

TB: I think ultimately, what I would love to see is just an elevated experience for those who come here to enjoy what Crested Butte is. I think the areas in which we can elevate that experience, we have to learn. We’ve got to get to know the community. We’ve got to get to know what our visitors are looking for. What our locals are looking for. And try to identify where we can make a difference. We don’t presume to think we know what that is. We’re essentially going to do an investigation period.

CBN: How do the town and the resort integrate and collaborate?

TB: That’s one of the most important pieces of the overall experience. I think people who come here during the winter to ski are going to go to town. So that is a piece of the experience. How do we correlate that in a way to where it is as seamless of an experience as possible? How those two things correlate is, for me, still to be learned.

CBN: As for the mountain itself, it sounds like the company wants to put a Vail Resorts shine on the mountain with some upgrades down the road. Have you all thought specifically about what you might want to do?

TB: We’ll spend most of our time, particularly this year, looking at the experience through the eyes of all the different stakeholder groups: Destination visitors, locals, employees, never-evers, extreme skiers. And try to assess the experience through all of their eyes so that we can determine what will make the biggest difference. We want to gain perspective. I tend to spend a lot of time out in the community and trying to learn of the history. There’s a lot of circumstances on the mountain of how lifts are meaningful to different people. All of that goes into the overall analysis to determine how we can make the biggest impact.

EM: The company has said it will spend $35 million amongst the four resorts [CBMR, Okemo, Sunapee and Stevens Pass]. I don’t think Vail Resorts has a specific plan yet. There is money going toward things like the IT systems. But in all four locations they are taking the time to look at and see where there are opportunities to best spend the money in the next 18 months.

CBN: Have you talked about the Teo-2 expansion?

TB: I’m familiar with it to the point of looking at maps. I know where it is. I haven’t read the submittal documents. I have not read the history of it. That will be a piece. That’s a piece of all the things that we may have the opportunity to invest in over time and where that plays in the overarching experience of those who are passionate about Crested Butte. We’ll see how it all flushes out.

CBN: Do you and your family plan to live in town? On the mountain? Does it matter?

TB: It does matter. We’ve identified a place of residence. My wife is a planner and she very quickly scoured the community and found a great place to call home and rent.

CBN: Is the family excited?

TB: We have two young boys and they are very excited. They are beside themselves with excitement that they are coming to Crested Butte. They’ve had great experiences here in the past. They visited the schools last week and my oldest in second grade already got to meet a bunch of classmates.

CBN: When you’re not working, what do you like to do?

TB: I love mountain biking. I enjoy being on my bike. Usually if I get time away I’m with my kids. I love spending time with my boys. I’m a pretty avid reader. I love reading and listening to podcasts. So I’m a lifelong learner is how I would characterize myself.

CBN: I understand you played football?

TB: I did. I grew up in the Texas panhandle, so football was a big part of my life growing up. I ended up playing at Texas Tech as wide receiver and spent three years in the NFL. I was with the Steelers, Panthers, and finished in San Diego with the Chargers.

CBN: So what is your favorite team?

TB: Steelers. I’m a big fan. I bleed black and gold.

CBN: You’ll fit in with Norton and Marchitelli.

TB: John sent me a note already.

CBN: A couple of things on the hill itself. Will you still allow uphill skiing?

TB: That’s a piece we will be assessing and we understand that is a big part of the experience. I can’t say we’re familiar yet with what’s been in place over the years but we’ll assess that over time.

CBN: What about water. Is there enough to make snow this winter?

TB: Water is definitely an area I have not spent a lot of time on yet. Water and water rights is a big part of every one of our mountains. Ultimately we will be following whatever regulations are in place pertaining to the access to water that we have.

CBN: Given the shortness of the transition period to Vail Resorts, is it pretty hectic?

TB: The amount of support that’s available is great, and we will rely heavily on the expertise that’s here. The reputation that Crested Butte has is very strong and the leaders I’ve had the opportunity to meet so far—I feel that we are well positioned for a positive opening.

EM: I’d also add that the support from Broomfield [VR corporate headquarters] is a great resource that comes with Vail Resorts. They have a massive team there that can help ensure the integration.

TB: Integration and acquisitions is a big part of our company culture. While we’re navigating through the integration here locally, the rest of the company understands that they have roles in this as well. To the extent that we reach out for support in whatever fashion, there are people at the ready to provide that.

EM: And not just Broomfield actually, which is something I’ve found that is cool. Maybe somebody from Breckenridge or Vail Mountain or Park City provides support. It isn’t just corporate. It is a whole family that comes with it.

CBN: When you talk about the culture of Vail Resorts, what is it? Are you a ski company?

TB: We are a ski company but we’re very focused on experiences of a lifetime. The guest experience that we deliver across the entire enterprise is our central focus. We try to articulate what the expectations should be and then we hope to exceed it. So we will focus the bulk of our attention on ways that we can provide legendary guest experience.

CBN: When the resort opens—are you a skier or snowboarder?

TB: I am a skier. I love skiing but I certainly welcome riders. I can’t say I’ve spent a lot of time on the board. As tall as I am I have a long ways to fall. I definitely consider myself a very passionate skier and I’ll be out on the hill as many times as I possibly can. The terrain here is nothing short of legendary. There’s such a wide diverse series of terrain that just doesn’t exist at other mountains and I believe that is what makes Crested Butte so distinct and so desirable within the ski industry.

CBN: Have you skied the back here? Been on the Extremes?

TB: I have not. I skied here once about five or six years ago. I can’t wait to get up and get the tour. Everybody’s been telling me that they’ll show me some amazing things.

CBN: Go with someone you trust. How many days did you get last year?

TB: I think I was mid-40s. Forty-five has kind of been my typical. I will likely set a higher goal than that for this coming year. I’m going to get out as much as I can.

CBN: You have anything else you want to add?

TB: Ultimately, we’re just excited to be here. This is an incredible time for Vail Resorts. It’s an incredible time for Crested Butte. I believe the future is very bright. The time that I’ve been here I have seen such passion here. People are proud. People are proud of this community. They’re proud of this mountain. And we look forward to honoring that. That’s mostly what I’m excited about.

Of Vinotok and blue herons

The social media firestorm of what some people think about Vinotok is an irritating kerfuffle. A politically incorrect action is not that unusual in Crested Butte—but actions do have consequences. The fact that the Grump was an effigy of Trump is not that surprising in a small liberal ski community, and it should also not be surprising that it offended some people. When I hear in the midst of the hubbub that some with the organizing committee deny now that it was a direct Trump effigy and meant to be just a faceless politician that anyone could interpret, I believe that as much as I believe my head of hair has never been fuller or less grey.

My quick thought is that it wasn’t necessarily necessary to do and ultimately it generated grumps for some instead of burning them. Being an advocate of free speech, I support the idea that the choice was made. At the same time, those who did it and might be offended if a group of right-wingers burn an effigy of Hillary in protest have little cause to be upset with that. What goes around comes around.

For the visitors who felt compelled to write the county, town and Vail (huh?) and tattle while expressing shock and dismay and “threatening” to not spend any more money in town—that’s cool. This place probably isn’t for you. You probably should find a less edgy place where you might feel more comfortable to spend your money. Believe it or not, Vinotok is a lot less wild than it used to be, but the underlying theme of celebrating the equinox while sticking it to “the man” remains. It has evolved to honor more people in the community throughout the week while being more than a simple, big-ass fire (which I miss). As one of the local marshals mentioned in the middle of the mumming, “This is part of who we are.”

For those visitors who were offended, if you look beneath the veneer of the tourist façade, this place is one where people are normally pretty friendly but a bit different from those in the “real world.” People here are loud and unashamed. People yell and fight—with each other and with those they disagree with on the state and national level. People are passionate about the local environment because it is their backyard. Some men here regularly wear dresses. Some women here have more testosterone that an NFL lineman. Dressing up is not just for Halloween and long before pot was legal in Colorado there were what we call Townie Takeovers that almost always start at 4:20 (Google it). People work really hard but less normal hours than you might. Most people here don’t feel comfortable in a cubicle and might take a run or bike ride on single track at lunch instead of sneaking in a martini.

I could go on (and have in the past) but you get the idea. Not every place is supposed to be the same with a common bottom denominator. We abhor gentrification. Most of those living here fiercely fight that idea, so I don’t expect it to change. Given that, you might enjoy an all-inclusive resort experience in Florida more than Vinotok or Flauschink or the Chainless or the AJ or some other “interesting” weekend in Crested Butte. These types of events are a big part of the community that makes Crested Butte what it is. They aren’t always pretty for everyone but they sure are unique. If they make you uncomfortable I can understand that. No offense—and none taken.

On a topic that might be more than a kerfuffle but in some ways speaks to the same conflict of change and outside perception, the community is debating how to handle humans in the Upper Slate River in the spring. Because some unusual wildlife is part of the landscape and SUPs (standup paddleboards) have recently made entry to that area more accessible at high water times, there is some conflict. A gathering of community has been meeting for months to discuss the situation and this Thursday evening that group will officially present their findings and suggestions.

The early report seems to me to be too much of a compromise—but that report is still in a draft form so can be tweaked. The blue heron and the elk that live there are as much a part of this community as us humans. We should be choosing to do what we can to make sure they remain part of this community. That might involve more stringent action than the draft report is suggesting.

As Crested Butte grows and changes, I can accept most of the change as long as we stay true to our ideals. One of those ideals is doing what it takes to keep us different. I still trust that we will make choices that protect the unique elements of our community—whether it be Vinotok or the blue heron.

—Mark Reaman

Community Calendar Thursday, September 20–Wednesday, September 26

THURSDAY 20
• 6-7 a.m. Sunrise Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7-7:45 a.m. Guided Meditation at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. School of Dance Adult Ballet with Jesse in the Pump Room Studio. (runs thru Nov. 1)
• 8 a.m. Ecumenical Meditation at UCC.
• 8:30 a.m. Women’s book discussion group at UCC.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Level 2 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45-10 a.m. School of Dance Adult Beginner/Intermediate Tap with Amber in the Pump Room Studio. (runs thru Nov. 1)
• 9 a.m. Historic Walking Tour at the Crested Butte Heritage Museum.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Vinyasa Level 1/2 at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 10:15-11:30 a.m. Ashtanga Vinyasa / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics Level 1 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 11 a.m. Weekly storytime at Townie Books. 349-7545.
• 11:30 a.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• noon All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Church Community Healing Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• noon-1:15 p.m. Vinyasa Level 1/2 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4-5 p.m. RockAsana at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage, a free thrift store. 300 Belleview, Unit 2, on the south end of 3rd Street. 970-318-6826.
• 4:30-6 p.m. Crested Butte Community Food Bank open at Oh Be Joyful Church. (1st & 3rd Thursday)
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Yin at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 5:45 p.m. Cardio Dance at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-9 p.m. Canvas & Cocktails in the Gunnison Arts Center Main Gallery.
• 6:30 p.m. AA Open Meditation at UCC.
• 6:30-8 p.m. Restorative Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7 p.m. Women Supporting Women Group Discussion at the Nordic Inn.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.
• 7:30-8:30 p.m. Adult Tap: Advanced Beginners & Intermedidate in the Gunnison Arts Center Dance Studio.
• 8:15-8:45 p.m. Free Meditation / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 p.m. Evening Sadhana / CB Co-op at Town Hall.

FRIDAY 21
• 6-7:15 a.m. Hip Hop Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30 a.m. Adult Ballet Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8 a.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back). 349-6482.
• 8:30-9:15 a.m. Aerial Conditioning w/ CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• 8:45 a.m. Core Power Yoga Class at the Pump Room.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Flexibly Challenged / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Prana Vinyasa Level 2/3 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 9:15-10 a.m. Open Aerial Play w/ CB School of Dance at the Center for the Arts.
• 10:15-11:30 a.m. Hatha Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Iyengar at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon-1:15 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 1 p.m. Art group meets at the Senior Center. 641-4529.
• 5 p.m. Friday Night Tennis at the CB Town Courts. (thru mid-September)
• 5:30 p.m. Communion Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 6-7 p.m. Poi Playshop at the Pump Room.
• 6:30-7:45 p.m. Restorative at Yoga For The Peaceful.

SATURDAY 22
• 7:30 a.m. Open AA at UCC.
• 7:45 a.m. Weights and Indoor Biking Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8-9 a.m. Mindful Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Community Yoga at the Sanctuary Yoga & Pilates Studio, Gunnison.
• 10-11 a.m. Hip Hop Community Dance Class at the Pump Room (above Fire House on 3rd & Maroon). 415-225-5300.
• 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery in the Gunnison Arts Center Clay Studio.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage, a free thrift store. 300 Belleview, Unit 2, on the south end of 3rd Street. 970-318-6826.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 6:30-7:30 p.m. Guided Sound Meditation at 405 4th Street.

SUNDAY 23
• 7-8 a.m. Meditation at Yoga for the Peaceful, by donation.
• 7-8:15 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8:30 a.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 8:30 a.m. Oh Be Joyful Church Worship Service at the Center for the Arts outdoor field.
• 9 a.m. Worship Service at Union Congregational Church. 349-6405.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 9:30-11 a.m. Free Community Class / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10 a.m. Oh Be Joyful Church Worship Service at the Center for the Arts outdoor field.
• 10-11:15 a.m. Vin-Yin at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Crested Butte Farmer’s Market on the 1st block of Elk Ave.
• 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Narcotics Anonymous Meeting at UCC, 403 Maroon Ave. Closed meeting for addicts only. (1st & 3rd Sundays)
• 4-5:15 p.m. CBCYC Community Book Club at 405 4th Street.
• 5-6 p.m. All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Eucharist at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• 5-7 p.m. Pick-up Adult Basketball. HS Gym, CBCS.
• 6 p.m. AA meets at UCC.
• 6 p.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• 6 p.m. Evening Service at Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, 711 N. Main St., Gunnison.
• 6-7:30 p.m. Calm Deep Healing/ CB Yoga Co-op at Town Hall.
• 6:30-7:45 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7 p.m. Gamblers Anonymous meets at the Last Resort.

MONDAY 24
• 6-7:15 a.m. Hip Hop Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7 a.m. Adult Ballet Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Intro to Ashtanga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8:45 a.m. Mat Mix at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Iyengar at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Adult Children of Alcoholics open meeting at Union Congretional Church.
• noon-1 p.m. Gentle Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon-1:15 p.m. Free Hatha Yoga / CB Yoga Co-op at Town Hall.
• 12:45 p.m. Bridge at the Senior Center. 641-4529.
• 4 p.m. Hard Hat Tours at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Yin Yoga Nidra at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 5:30-7 p.m. Moms in Motion class at the GVH rehab gym.
• 5:30-7:30 p.m. Drawing Skills at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. (Mondays thru October 1)
• 5:45-7 p.m. Mindful Flow / CB Yoga Co-op at Town Hall.
• 6-7 p.m. Body Maintenance at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6-8 p.m. Quilting in the Gunnison Arts Center Adult Art Studio.
• 6:30 p.m. WellBeing Connection Workshop at the CB/Mt. CB Chamber of Commerce.
• 6:30-8 p.m. Women’s Domestic Violence Support Group at Project Hope. Childcare available upon request. 641-2712.
• 7:30 p.m. Open AA at UCC. 349-5711.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.

TUESDAY 25
• 6-7 a.m. Sunrise Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7-7:45 a.m. Meditation at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7:30 a.m. AA/Alanon Open at UCC. 349-5711.
• 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Free Co-Working Tuesdays at the ICELab at WSCU.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Level 2 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Mindful Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45-10 a.m. School of Dance Adult Jazz Fusion with Adge in the Pump Room Studio. (runs thru Oct. 30)
• 9 a.m. Historic Walking Tour at the Crested Butte Heritage Museum.
• 10:15-11:30 a.m. Hatha Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics Level 1 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 11:30 a.m. League of Women Voters meeting at 210 W. Spencer in Gunnison.
• noon AA Closed at UCC.
• 1:30-3:30 p.m. Tech Tuesdays at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 2-3:15 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4-5 p.m. Family Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage, a free thrift store. 300 Belleview, Unit 2, on the south end of 3rd Street. 970-318-6826.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 5:45 p.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 5:45-7 p.m. Relax and Rejuvenate / CB Co-op at Town Hall .
• 6 p.m. Literary Salon Series: Paolo Bacigalupi with the Literary Arts Department of the Center for the Arts at the Public House. 349-7044.
• 6-7 p.m. Piyo at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6-8 p.m. Figure Drawing Sessions with live model in Downtown Crested Butte. 349-7228.
• 7 p.m. Alanon meeting at the Last Resort.
• 7-8:30 p.m. Blessing Way Circle support group at Sopris Women’s Clinic. 720-217-3843.
• 7:15-8:30 p.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.

WEDNESDAY 26
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7-8:15 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7:30 a.m. The Crested Butte / Mt. Crested Butte Rotary Club breakfast meeting in the Shavano Conference Room at the Elevation Hotel.
• 8:30 a.m. Hike with HCCA. Sign up at hccacb.org.
• 8:45 a.m. Pilates at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 9:30-10:45 a.m. Kaiut Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Two Buttes Senior Citizens van transportation. Roundtrip to Gunnison. Weather permitting. Call first for schedule and availability. 275-4768.
• 10:30 a.m.-noon Prana Vinyasa Level 2/3 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon-1:15 p.m. Free Hatha Yoga / CB Yoga Co-op at Town Hall.
• 12:15-12:45 p.m. Yoga Nidra Relaxtion at Yoga for the Peaceful. ($5 donation)
• 2-3:15 p.m. Forrest Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 3:30-5 p.m. ICELab tours at Western State College University with Patrick Rowley.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5-10 p.m. Game night at Tassinong Farms, CB South.
• 5:15-6:15 p.m. Adult Ballet/Barre Conditioning in the Gunnison Arts Center Dance Studio.
• 5:30 p.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30 p.m. Prenatal Yoga class in Crested Butte South. 349-1209.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Vinyasa Level 2/3 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 5:15-7:45 p.m. Creativity & Cocktails Series: Cocktails & Canvases with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts at Tully’s in Crested Butte South. 349-7044.
• 5:45-7 p.m. Restorative Yoga / CB Yoga Co-op at Town Hall.
• 6:30 p.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back), 4th and Maroon. 349-6482.
• 7-9 p.m. “GriefShare,” a grief recovery seminar and support group, meets at Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, 711 N. Main St., Gunnison. 970-349-7769.

 

Events & Entertainment

THURSDAY 20
• 6 p.m. Evelyn Roper and Sean Turner’s Honky Tonk Happy Hour at the Talk of the Town.
• 6-8 p.m. Scout’s Workshops: Vinotok Flower Crowns with Gina English at Scout’s General Store.
• 7 p.m. Sneak Peek of the Crested Butte Film Festival: North of Nightfall with the Crested Butte Film Festival at the Center for the Arts. 303-204-9080.
• 7 p.m. Floyd Bauer plays at The Princess Wine Bar.
• 8 p.m. Vinotok: The Botsie Spritzer Memorial Liar’s Contest at Kochevar’s.
• 8 p.m. Ladies’ Night at the Red Room.
• 9 p.m. Robot Monkey Death Squad plays at the Public House.

FRIDAY 21
• 3:30-6 p.m. Fall Twilight Lift Access at CBMR.
• 4:30 p.m. EVOLadies Twilgiht Ride with CBMBA, meet at the Evolution Bike Shop.
• 5:30 p.m. Vinotok: Community Feast on the 100 Block of Elk. Festivities begin at 5:30 p.m. w/ dinner following at 6:30 p.m.
• 7 p.m. Tyler Hansen plays at The Princess Wine Bar.
• 7 p.m. Gunrack plays at the Talk of the Town.
• 8 p.m. Moonlight Music Series: We Dream Dawn in the Gunnison Arts Center Black Box Theatre.
• 9 p.m. Ragin’ 4 Pagan w/ New Flat Earth & The Sun Gazers at the Public House.
• 10 p.m. DJ 2AR at the Eldo.

SATURDAY 22
• 11 a.m. Celebration of Life Memorial Service for Kib Crank at UCC with a potluck gathering at Rainbow Park Pavilion.
• 5-7:30 p.m. Vinotok: Mumming by cast and crew on Elk Avenue and adjoining restaurants and pubs.
• 5-8 p.m. Artists of Crested Butte ArtWalk in participating galleries of Crested Butte.
• 5:30-8:30 p.m. Art Studio Gallery Featured Artists’ Reception at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 7 p.m. Sam Heart plays at The Princess Wine Bar.
• 7:30 (ish) p.m. Vinotok: Trial of the Grump on Elk Avenue in front of the Eldo.
• 8:30 (ish) p.m. Vinotok: Procession down Elk Avenue to the Four-way and Bonfire.
• 9 p.m. DJ Mikey Thunder and DJ Just Howe at the Public House.

SUNDAY 23
• 3 p.m. Live music on the deck with James Brett Jarnagin at the Eldo.
• 7 p.m. Paradise Divide plays at The Princess Wine Bar.
• 9 p.m. El Dub plays at the Public House.

TUESDAY 25
• 10 a.m. Non-Fiction Book Club: Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River at Rumors.
• 7 p.m. Dwayne Dodson plays at The Princess Wine Bar.

WEDNESDAY 26
• 7 p.m. Lian Patterson plays at The Princess Wine Bar.
• 8 p.m. Ladies’ Night at The Talk of the Town.
• 9 p.m. Matador! Soul Sounds play at the Public House.

 

Kid’s Calendar

THURSDAY 20
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class at the High Altitude Dance Academy in Gunnison.
• 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Art Babies & Toddler Art (ages 0-4) at The Trailhead. 349-7160.

FRIDAY 21
• 11 a.m. Big Kids Storytime (ages 3-7) at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 1:30 p.m. Little Minds (ages 3-7) at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 2:30-3:15 p.m. Art Start for Toddlers (ages 2-5 w/ caregiver) in the Gunnison Arts Center Kids Art Studio. (occurs weekly w/ drop-in option)
• 4-5 p.m. Tang Soo Do Martial Arts classes for youth with West Elk Martial Arts, Town Hall Fitness Room. 901-7417.

MONDAY 24
• 3:45-5 p.m. Messy Mondays at the Crested Butte Library. (ages 5-12, 8 & under must be accompanied by an adult)
• 4-5 p.m. Kids Yoga (ages 8 & under) at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.

TUESDAY 25
• 4:30-6:30 p.m. Sidewalk Chalk Art (ages 10+) in the Gunnison Arts Center Kids Art Studio.

WEDNESDAY 26
• 9 a.m. Munchkin’s Music and Dance Class in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. 349-9639.
• 11 a.m. Baby & Toddler Literacy Time at the Crested Butte Library.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4-5 p.m. Kids Yoga (ages 8+) at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 4:15-5:15 p.m. Kids Yoga (ages 8 and under) at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4:15-5:45 p.m. Ballet/Tap Combo (ages 7-10) in the Gunnison Arts Center Dance Studio.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 6:15-7:15 p.m. Steezy Hip Hop (ages 9-12) in the Gunnison Arts Center Dance Studio.

Moratorium on some franchise business licenses to be discussed

Six months to figure out appropriate regulations

By Mark Reaman

The Crested Butte Town Council is moving toward enacting a six-month moratorium on issuing new business licenses for so-called “formula” restaurant and retail endeavors in town. Those six months will be spent analyzing the potential impacts of an increase in such franchise businesses and give the Board of Zoning and Architectural Review (BOZAR) time to formulate a recommendation to council.

A public hearing on the moratorium is slated for October 1, when the council will likely make a decision. Ultimately, the council will consider a limit on the number of formula/franchise restaurant and retail businesses allowed in Crested Butte.

The council discussed the matter for the second time at the September 17 council meeting. While the meeting was highly publicized, no business representatives attended the meeting to speak on the issue.

Borrowing language from a similar ordinance in Aspen, the starting point to define a formula/franchise business in Crested Butte is a “restaurant or retail commercial establishment that has ten or more other establishments in operation … and that maintains two or more of the following features: a standardized array of merchandise or menu items, standardized array of services, a standardized façade, a standardized décor and color scheme, uniform apparel, standardized signage, a trademark, or service mark.”

The motivation behind the proposed moratorium is to figure how to limit the number of franchise businesses allowed in Crested Butte so as to protect the local business district and overall character of town that is a designated National Historic District.

Despite the popular notion that franchises are not currently permitted in Crested Butte, there are several such businesses located in town, such as the Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory and True Value.

But council members recently held a pow-wow with officials from towns such as Park City, where Vail Resorts purchased the nearby ski area. The proliferation of franchise-type businesses was one warning Crested Butte officials took away from the conversation, so they want to get out ahead of the situation.

“We want to emphasize that this is intended to protect our businesses,” said councilman Kent Cowherd. “We are looking for their support and engagement. We are not seeking to ban franchises from town. We already have several. But we want to take an inventory of what we have and determine what would be appropriate for Crested Butte.”

Mayor Jim Schmidt emphasized that in discussions with officials from communities that had been affected by a sale  of the resort to Vail, the business community lobbied for such regulations limiting franchises.

Town manager Dara MacDonald said a moratorium gives council time to do just that. “It is a tool for a time-out while you decide what you ultimately want to do,” she told the council. “The proposed moratorium ordinance directs the town to gather input from local businesses, property owners, visitors and citizens about their thoughts regarding franchises. Chris [Haver] and I have spoken with Ashley [UpChurch] at the chamber of commerce and we will set up meetings to engage the public about their thoughts on the matter. Ultimately it will go to BOZAR and then to the council.”

The moratorium “is directed solely at restaurant and retail,” added councilman Chris Haver. “It leaves out things like service businesses such as real estate offices or a carpet cleaning business.”

In a memo to the council, MacDonald wrote at least 30 jurisdictions across the country have some sort of regulations governing formula businesses. The thought is to preserve businesses with unique local character, avoid the generic appearance of storefronts in town and potentially minimize the escalation of rents associated with the demands created by national chains.

While the town tried to get the word out to some local stakeholders about the upcoming issue, no business representatives attended the September 17 meeting to address the issue. The council will look for more public input during the official public hearing scheduled for October 1.

Profile: Mike Larson

A slice of life in paradise

By Dawne Belloise

There’s no doubt that Mike Larson is a mountain dweller through and through, with his love of the outdoors and his fervor for mountain biking, although he laughs that he hails from “redneck stuff,” growing up in Watchung Hills, N.J. His dad gave him a love and respect for hunting and fishing and Mike even dabbled in taxidermy until around the age of 15, when he became aware of the imbalance of the eco-system.

“At a certain point, hunters were part of the ecosystem but I don’t consider humans as part of the natural ecosystem any longer, not like the Native Americans who lived in harmony with nature. I try not to be a hypocrite—I do eat meat and I’ve butchered everything that’s ever flown, swam or walked in my lifetime as being a pro cook.”

He clarifies though that he’s not referring to sustenance hunting. “I’m basically talking about the trophy hunters. I had these hunter roots but I never felt that great about killing a deer.”

All through high school, Mike had the idealistic vision of wanting to save the world and figured he’d become an environmental scientist. After graduating in 1982, he attended Ramapo College in northern New Jersey for a year, which he felt was just a stepping stone, and afterwards transferred to University of Wyoming in Laramie. The reality of having to take a stifling amount of math and chemistry deterred his ambition of being in the science field and he switched to industrial education. “Those are the degrees they offered to the football or basketball players so I became friends with them. It was a laughable, outdated program even then,” he says.

Mike had discovered his love for road biking and racing at 15 and joined the Somerset Wheelman Club for racing, touring through the undeveloped lands of New Jersey. Unfortunately, later, while at the University of Wyoming, his bike was stolen, but it became the turning point for him as he bought his first mountain bike.

“Then I fell in love with the mountain bike trails, and in winter I’d cross country ski those same trails at Vedauwoo, east of Laramie, in a very rocky wilderness area not unlike Taylor Canyon.” It wasn’t long before he switched to Montana State University in Bozeman because they had a better program in industrial education. “I ended my college career there. I got my first season pass in 1983 at Bridger Bowl, where I started telemark skiing. The rest is history,” he smiles.

From Bozeman, Mike moved to Steamboat Springs in 1985, but only for one winter season, skiing and dish diving before moving on to Jackson Hole, Wyo. “I wanted to experience the Tetons. I always had an affinity to Wyoming—less than a half million people, it was the least populated state in the U.S. In fact, it was losing population. From there, I had an inkling that I could become a cook because I had what I felt was a natural ability to cook. I fibbed my way into my first cook job at Teton Village at the ski area, telling them I had been cooking at an Italian restaurant in Steamboat and within a couple of months I was running that Teton kitchen. You don’t have to be a great chef to be hired as a cook in the kitchen.”

Mike feels that a good work ethic is the key to success. “I’ve put my time in as a line cook and whoever’s running that kitchen will teach you what you need for that menu and you should be grateful for what you’ve learned in that particular kitchen.” He was at Jackson Hole for three years, where he also worked as a cook at the Mangy Moose and the Blue Lion.

When John Byrne, who owned the restaurant Mike had worked at in Jackson Hole, bought the Eldo in Crested Butte in 1987, he offered Mike a cook job and Mike also assisted in getting the restaurant and bar open. He arrived in town in August and, having never been to Crested Butte, he was awed.

“I couldn’t believe that this place existed. There were so few people here and it was super cool. I had come over on Kebler Pass and it was about four months before I even left to go to Gunnison,” and getting there, he recalls, “The highway wasn’t even an improved road, it was almost a single lane.”

Mike became even more of an avid cyclist. “I was way into mountain biking and it was because of that—Crested Butte was an up and coming mountain bike destination.” He quickly fell into the small community of skiers and cyclists here. “There was a tight group of people and we were all friends. There were only about 500 people living in town then, we were a close community. In the summer, we’d camp to save money and in the winter we’d move into a house with five other people because that’s how we did it, that’s how ski bums do it, isn’t it?” he laughs.

After two years at the Eldo, Mike moved on to work for Crested Butte Mountain Resort from 1990 through 1995 at their fine dining restaurants like Jeremiah’s and Giovanni’s, where Club Med eventually had their dining facility. “In the summer, they’d send me down to their country club at Skyland. During off-season, which was a lot longer back then, I’d go ride Moab and just enjoy the freedom. I was literally living the life.”

In 1995, he hooked up with Geo Bullock, as a cook and partner, and the two entrepreneurs moved to Moab to start the Gonzo Café. “It was a dream of both of ours, to have our own restaurant. We had dirt-cheap prices, doing breakfast and lunch and catering to the sprouting bicycling community of Moab. Mountain biking was just starting there.”

Ah, but, Crested Butte called them home, as it does for so many who try to leave and once it’s under your skin, you long to return no matter where you are. “So we came running back here, but not before learning a lot about the restaurant business, and we had a successful business.”

He returned to start up the Buffalo Grill with partners Cathy Benson and the late Jimmy Clark. Mike had just become a father to Maya, his daughter, in 1996. Club Med was ruling the town at the time, Mike says, and he felt it affected Crested Butte. “It was the first inkling of change in the mid-90s. Crested Butte had grown.”

Club Med brought an international exposure and their clients ate at Buffalo Grill when they came to town. Buffalo Grill sold in 2001 and Mike ran his Happy Trails Café out of the Eldo for five years, working with Ted Bosler and Mike Knoll.

“I had a pizza dough recipe in my wallet, that my dad’s friend in Florida had shared with me. When the spot over by the skateboard park became available in 2007, I knew we could create a small pizzeria there and feed the locals,” Mike says of the place they’ve sold slices and pies out of for 11 years.

That same year, he married his partner, Mary Hayes, and the two opened Mikey’s Pizza. “There’s a lot more to running a restaurant than meets the eye and my partner-wife, Mary, does the paperwork and the business part of it, all the other stuff that you don’t see. I met Mary in 2005, when I was cooking at the Eldo and she was visiting here, checking out the Mountain Heart Massage School. We’ve been happily ever after ever since.”

They opened the Gunnison branch of Mikey’s Pizza in 2012, and successfully sold it in 2017. “We put that in the ‘been there, done that’ category,” he grins, and he didn’t miss the 60 miles of round-trip driving.

Through all the hard work and long hours of restaurant ownership and cooking, Mike still found time to ski and bike. “I find enjoyment in the simple things. You don’t have time for everything, so you have to choose what you’re going to focus on. I’ve always loved the ease of being able to access the backcountry wherever I was.”

But less than two years ago, in 2016, Mike had a life-altering, life-threatening situation slam him. After a remarkable week of biking Moab, he went to ride the Palisade Rim trail. “I felt a numb lip, lost balance and felt nauseated, but I was in denial.” Ignoring the danger signs, he went on a 25-mile ride in Crested Butte and it happened again. This time, it was same symptoms but with a thunderclap headache, “like somebody hitting me over the head with a club, and I had to lay down on the side of the trail.” He was airlifted out and taken to Swedish Medical Center in Denver, where he spent five days and was told he had aneurisms. “They put me on baby aspirins.” He shrugged and went on to have a good ski season that winter.

But one year later, last year, while riding solo on the Secret Trail that connects to Carbon Creek Trail, he was hit hard again. “It was 6 p.m. I took the ‘Don Cook motorcycle trail’ [Para Me y Para Te Trail] up to the Green Lake trail. I wasn’t feeling great and it’s not an easy trail. I rode down to Mikey’s Pizza and at that point I knew it was happening again, but I thought I could fix it myself, by taking a bath.” Mike was in complete denial.

“Mary knew I wasn’t right and took me to the hospital, where I got another helicopter ride to St. Mary’s in Grand Junction. By the time I got there, I was experiencing triple hiccups, loss of swallowing, I couldn’t walk and I was unable to form sentences. I had lost all motor control, I had a feeding tube and I couldn’t even brush my teeth. It brought me to my knees.”

He spent an entire month at St. Mary’s where, at one point, he was close to death, having also contracted pneumonia. Mike’s correct diagnosis was vertebral artery dissection, a blockage in his artery, essentially, a stroke. “I’m still recovering, which they say will take about two years. It’s been a year and I’m still healing. I still have some symptoms—my face is numb and I can’t feel hot or cold because my nerves got fried.” He also experienced a rare symptom of the condition called Wallenberg Syndrome, which he explains as “a lower brain stem stroke, specifically the loss of swallowing, with hiccups and vertigo.”

Mike always knew that Crested Butte would someday be discovered but he felt, “Leaving wasn’t an option for me. I wasn’t going to be displaced,” and he was fortunate enough to scrape together enough to buy a condo.

“The trails have become better so there are more people here enjoying it and that was inevitable. You can’t stop the change. Population has increased throughout the world and Crested Butte was going to be discovered at some point, especially with the information age. The internet has really opened things up and people show trophy photos of this great place. That’s what I feel has really opened Crested Butte up to the rest of the world. As far as losing our soul, the high price of land and the second homeowners whose houses are dark most of the year have displaced locals. I didn’t move here to make money or get rich, I came here to live. It’s unrealistic to think that Crested Butte was going stay like it was in the 80s. I think it’s still a great place to be, as long as we evolve with the change. You can’t let the trust-funders or the big money coming to town get you down. We can’t let that diminish our love for this place, for these mountains, for this town. You gotta roll with the changes. I don’t know of any place that is better or able to escape the evolving reality of the world.”

Brush Creek sketch plan leans toward an approval

Public hearing on the sketch plan closes

By Kristy Acuff

The Gunnison County Planning Commission heard just over 60 minutes of comments during the final session of the public hearing on the proposed The Corner at Brush Creek affordable housing development sketch plan on Friday, July 20. County staff was instructed to draft an approval document with conditions.

Approximately 100 people attended the hearing concerning the sketch plan of the 220-unit housing development that would sit on the 14 acres of land currently owned by the county at the corner of Brush Creek Road and Highway 135.

In addition, county attorney David Baumgarten and attorney for the developer, Gatesco Inc., Kendall Burgemeister reported the results of recent efforts to bring multiple valley stakeholders to the table to discuss the proposal with the Gatesco team, as directed by the county last month.

In response to a proposed idea that the affordable housing project be moved to Mt. Crested Butte, Burgemeister reported that while the Mt. Crested Butte council has authorized town staff to evaluate the town’s 17-acre parcel near its town hall as a potential site for affordable housing, “If they decide to go that route, they indicated that [developer] Gary Gates would not be given first dibs to that land parcel, nor would that land parcel be connected in any way to the proposed Brush Creek development.”

In addition, Burgemeister addressed a previous suggestion that the housing development tap into the East River Sanitation District’s wastewater treatment plant instead of building its own stand-alone treatment plant.

Proponents of this idea suggest that could drive down costs and allow the density of the development to be reduced without impacting profit.

“The East River Sanitation District directed us to file an official application so they can evaluate whether or not they can serve this project and amend their rules to allow reduced tap fees for workforce housing,” said Burgemeister. “We are submitting an application but we don’t anticipate that connection to drive down development costs significantly. But it would eliminate the need for an additional wastewater treatment plant.

“And we also spoke with Skyland Metro District about tapping into its water and were told that is not an option, so we will proceed with our proposed well,” said Burgemeister.

Jim Schmidt, mayor of Crested Butte, described the meetings between Gatesco and the Town Council that, he said, did not produce substantive results. “The process evoked a good deal of frustration for our citizens,” said Schmidt. “The council discussed this during four separate meetings that the developers attended but never presented substantive adaptations to the proposed project. They presented no alternatives to the current proposal.”

Later in the hearing, planning commissioner Molly Mugglestone asked Schmidt if the town of Crested Butte had ever offered subsidy in the form of tap fees for water and sewer, from the town to the applicant, an idea that surfaced during the previous Planning Commission hearing.

“I am offended by the idea that we, the town, are asked to subsidize this developer. Why are we being asked about this? Why isn’t the county being asked about this?” replied Schmidt. “This person has no property rights to the property. We have very limited actual public water. Coal Creek is a trickle this year and the idea that we are beholden to this particular developer and we would subsidize with town water—I find that offensive.”

David Leinsdorf, attorney representing the Friends of Brush Creek, a group that submitted an alternative housing development proposal last week to the Planning Commission, spoke about the stipulations of the Land Use Resolution (LUR) governing development in the county.

“The LUR states the proposed development must be compatible with the surrounding neighborhood and if you consider this proposal compatible, then, anything must be compatible by that definition,” said Leinsdorf. “The LUR does not authorize modifications to its standards even for a worthy project like affordable housing and this project represents significant modifications of existing standards.”

Following the presentations from the town of Crested Butte and the applicant, the Planning Commission opened the hearing up to the public for comment.

Kyleena Falzone, owner of the Secret Stash and Bonez restaurants in Crested Butte, spoke first. “I employ 150 people on payroll and housing is a critical, a massive issue for our county. It is hard to run a business when you don’t know if your staff will be around for the season because they lose their place to live. I am in support of this project moving from sketch plan to preliminary plan with conditions. One condition I have is that the units have to be governed and regulated by the Gunnison Valley Regional Housing Authority so we make sure to get them occupied by the workers who need the housing. This isn’t just about me. It’s about keeping the community together.”

Eileen Whitley expressed concerns about the density of the project and the traffic and parking problems that will ensue as a result. “This housing proposal is going to put 50 to 60 people per acre in a county where the average density is three people per acre. That is not quality of life,” said Whitley. “In addition, they are proposing 1.1 parking spaces per bedroom. That is inadequate. In the River neighborhood we have 1.5 spaces per bedroom and that is not enough. But in this development, where is the overflow going to park? On Brush Creek Road? On the highway? That is unsafe and illegal. And the traffic is going to be coming out of the development trying to turn left, first onto Brush Creek Road and then onto the highway. You are talking about 500 residents trying to turn left in a space of 450 feet. There will be no room to merge.”

George Gibson raised concerns about increasing construction costs forcing Gatesco to either reduce the quality of the project or increase expenses and threaten bankruptcy with the county. “Gatesco claims a 2 percent profit margin on this project,” said Gibson. “We can be pretty certain that construction costs are going to increase well beyond that 2 percent during the course of this project and you will end up with a slum building or something half-built, while the developer walks away.”

Kevin Hartigan, owner of the Last Steep Bar and Grill in Crested Butte, reiterated many of Falzone’s arguments in favor of the project with conditions. “The need for housing is now. It is incredibly challenging to run a business now, and ideally I would love to see this density spread throughout the valley. I care deeply about this community and I am open 363 days every year. I have workers who could be employed year-round but have to split because they lose their housing,” said Hartigan. “This isn’t the only solution but it is a step in the right direction.”

Lisa Merck, owner of Sopris Women’s Clinic, also spoke in favor of the project with conditions. “I am in support of this project with the condition that it is regulated so we don’t have people coming in from out of county, buying up our housing for our county’s workers,” said Merck.

Sam Lumb spoke in opposition to the project, stating, “I served on the Planning Commission and when I served, we denied an inappropriate development because it did not meet the LUR requirements. I implore you to deny this project. It is inappropriate and does not meet the LUR. That is your job.”

After just over an hour of testimony, the Planning Commission officially closed the public hearing and is now moving in the direction to approve the proposed sketch plan with conditions.

Planning commissioners directed the county staff to write a draft of conditions addressing density, parking, income qualifications for deed restrictions, wastewater treatment and water availability, traffic flow and a transit center. Staff estimates the draft will be prepared in three weeks and presented to the Planning Commission for review.

The Planning Commission must vote on the sketch plan within 60 days of the close of the public hearing on Friday, July 20.

“I can’t think of a sketch plan that has ever been approved without conditions,” said Cathie Pagano, county director of community and economic development. “Our job is now to take what we have heard and gathered from public comments during this hearing and synthesize it into conditions for the Planning Commission to consider.”

If the Planning Commission approves the sketch plan, the applicant would generate a more detailed preliminary plan that would then be subject to further review from both the public and the Planning Commission. Prior to any construction, however, at least thre of the four stakeholders in the 14-acre property under consideration must agree to sell it to Gatesco for $100,000. The stakeholders include the towns of Crested Butte and Mt. Crested Butte, Gunnison County and Crested Butte Mountain Resort.

“It is our intent to obtain approval from three of the four stakeholders before moving into the preliminary plan phase,” said Gatesco attorney Burgemeister.

“Why not obtain approval from all four?” asked planning commissioner A.J. Cattles.

“Because we only need a majority of stakeholders,” answered Burgemeister.

“But can the Planning Commission require that Gatesco obtain approval from all four as a condition of sketch plan? I want to keep peace in this valley and I think all four parties should approve,” stated Cattles, prompting county attorney David Baumgarten to intervene.

“I would caution you not to conflate your decision on sketch plan with the execution of a real estate contract. I would suggest to you that since there is an offer of three of the four of the stakeholders, you don’t want to exceed that offer with a condition. You keep to the limits set by the applicant,” stated Baumgarten.

“But the town of Crested Butte is closest to this and has the most at stake here and so the three out of four really worries me. I want to keep peace in the valley,” reiterated Cattles.

“Let me say it again more clearly: Limit that condition to that which is offered to you or we get into legal liability,” said Baumgarten.

“I was really hoping for more substantive details to emerge from the recent talks between Gatesco and the towns of Crested Butte and Mt. Crested Butte and if we keep it to three of the four stakeholders, then the talks might not continue as we hope they will,” said Cattles.

“Remember that approval of the sketch plan shall constitute approval for the general development concept only, not of specifics. Approval of the sketch plan would also authorize the applicant to submit a preliminary plan if he gets three of the four stakeholders to approve,” said Baumgarten.

At which point the planning commissioners generated a list of general conditions that must be addressed in order for the sketch plan to be approved. The list included density, parking, traffic flow, water availability and wastewater treatment, AMI (area median income) requirements for deed restrictions, and trails and public access.

“In addition to this general list, are there specific outlines or details of conditions you want?” asked Pagano.

“Water,” answered planning commissioner Jack Diani. “I would like a condition that states the applicant must test the well during the driest time of the year to ensure there is adequate water for the development.”

“And I would add the condition that the applicant secure the permanency of the deed restrictions so they will not be lifted in the event of economic downturn or other extenuating circumstances,” added planning commissioner Vince Rogalski.

“And make sure the applicant continues to pursue the application for wastewater treatment with the East River Sanitation District,” said planning commissioner Molly Mugglestone.

“In conclusion, I just want to thank the public and ask that they continue to have patience with us and thank you to the parties who have been involved in these conversations for the past six weeks,” said Cattles, addressing the audience at the end.

Profile: MJ Vosburg

There’s a part of MJ Vosburg’s story that’s atypical of many of the Crested Butte narratives. She’s a self-confessed mediocre alpine skier and doesn’t like to mountain bike since her first foray into the locally popular sport when she took a hard fall on her face and decided that was the end of that.

She emphasizes that she’s definitely not a mountain climber, although she loves to hike. In fact, she’s an avid hiker.

Essentially, MJ’s story is that she moved to Crested Butte for love, relocating here to be with Joel Vosburg in 1982. “I was never a single person in Crested Butte. Joel and I started our young lives together here.” She traded her career in psychology for life in a mountain town with a guy she was madly in love with.

Born and raised in Nashville until she was 18, she initially headed west to attend Denver University, earning her degree in psychology and social work. “I came to Denver on a plane. I had never been west of the Mississippi but DU gave me the best deal,” she says of her scholarship, and as for coming to Colorado, she smiles, “It changed my life and I never looked back.”

After graduating in 1980, MJ was hired as a counselor at a residential group home for 14-year-old to 18-year old girls. “Most of these girls had been removed from their homes because of their parents, or lack of parenting. You worked 24 hours on and 48 off.”

She and Joel had met and dated in college but as MJ says, “We broke up forever. I was more focused in my life at that point than he was.”

When Joel was hired for Crested Butte Mountain Resort’s Crested Butte student employee program, he moved up here. “I was in Denver. By the end of that winter he came to Denver and said we needed to be together.” MJ agreed and thought it would be best for them to move to Crested Butte for a year before deciding where to live their real life, and, she grins, “We never left.”

MJ got a job making sandwiches in the deli that used to be in the Emmons building on the mountain before landing a job as personnel director at Ptarmigan Realty. When Ptarmigan went out of business in April 1982, everybody lost their job, and she recalls the frenzy that ensued.

“Joel and I were getting married in May when they went belly-up and I was the main bread winner,” she recalls. “Lou Costello called me about the complex phone system that Ptarmigan had because everyone at CBMR also used it and it was going to shut down with the company going out of business. No one knew how to run it except me and Dave Lindsey. They offered me a job,” because, she says, they really had no choice except to hire her to operate that phone system.

Later, she evolved into the sales department for CBMR, selling ski packages to groups, when most of the busier skier days saw the slopes thick with tourists from Atlanta, Texas, Oklahoma and Florida.

MJ left CBMR to work for Solutions Inc., then the biggest property management company in the valley, and stayed with them for a decade as director of sales and marketing. “It was before CBMR got into the lodging business and we worked with them a lot. In those days, the talent that was in the ski resort was amazing. Skier days were at their peak in the late 1980s because of the masters of marketing.”

In fact, MJ says, “CBMR was setting the tone for the ski industry for Colorado. We did things first, like the direct flights from Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, and eventually Chicago and Newark. They developed so many innovative programs, like celebrity ski events that were a fundraiser for cystic fibrosis, through American Airlines.”

CBMR was also bringing in top-notch musicians who performed in the spacious Rafters (now demolished), amazing talent like the Allman Brothers, Gloria Estefan, Juice Newton, the Bee Gees, Roy Orbison and more. She notes that the X Games started here in the West, as well as the late, great Country in the Rockies.

There were also President Jimmy Carter’s ski events. “President Carter’s auctions, dinners and events raised money that went to help his Atlanta Project, kids that the Carters were very involved with. It was a great hey-day here. It all started in Crested Butte.”

But also during those days, many locals who had children decided to leave because, as hopping as the ski area was, MJ remembers, “You couldn’t make enough money because there weren’t enough consistent jobs. The Crested Butte school only went up to fifth grade and then your kids had to be bused to Gunnison, so most families left. That’s when the groups of people started realizing they needed more school space, because we didn’t want to send our sixth-grade kids to Gunnison and town was growing. There were more of us who had kids and who wanted to stay.”

MJ recalls the consensus in town was that a new middle school had to be built, for sixth through eighth grades. “We put it on the ballot, to split the Crested Butte school district from Gunnison, but it failed since all the votes were in Gunnison. After that failed election, we had more people getting involved and got it back on the ballot to build a K through 12 school at the north end of the valley, and it passed. What changed was that the school district realized that the population had grown in Crested Butte and also the Gunnison schools were aging.”

In 1987 Joel and MJ had their son, Zach, and built one of the only two houses in the town of Mt. Crested Butte, on Paradise Road.

“As young parents, we were working to get the schools built. The land that the Crested Butte Community School sits on now was part of an intricate trade agreement between the school district and the town of Crested Butte,” she notes. Having the necessary new school finally in the works played an integral part in keeping not only the Vosburgs in Crested Butte, but many families.

And town was indeed changing. The ski area had grown enough to provide more year-round jobs. Joel became CBMR’s food and beverage director and MJ was working at Solutions. “We just kept working. We worked a lot. We were a little family and our emphasis was starting to change. My emphasis changed from really focusing on the work that I was doing and being part of the mountain ski industry to being a mother.”

And the shift happened for Joel also, because the food and beverage business was not family-conducive. Joel worked all day and late into the night, oftentimes having to close down the Rafters. Joel quit his job in 1989, not knowing what he was going do, but they resolved the issue, “He became the primary parent and I was still working at Solutions for Crested Butte Accommodations.”

Joel mostly took care of Zach, moonlighting as a chimney sweep and waiting tables at the Artichoke (now the Avalanche) before deciding to go into real estate.

“We had put off having a second child and we had considered leaving but didn’t want to,” MJ says. Even though real estate was in the tank at that time, they decided to have another child anyway and their daughter, Emma, was born in 1991. With Joel now at Becky Hamlin Realty, MJ took the big step, leaving her long-time job to once again be a fulltime mom. “It was the best decision I ever made for my family and myself,” she realized. “The beautiful thing that happened was that I let go of all this drive and career stuff,” which then opened the door to far more interesting opportunities. “I started working for the Lodging Tax Panel, now called the Tourism Association. Their goal was to market summer and fall in Crested Butte and Gunnison. Back then, our summers weren’t so crazy and there needed to be more emphasis on summer tourism.”

In 1993, MJ began working as the ad sales person for the Crested Butte Magazine, a position she still has after 25 years. “I get to work with my best friend, Sandy Fails, it’s the best gig ever,” she smiles. MJ also sells ads for Elk Mountain Real Estate Review as well as the In-Room Guide, a tabbed book that goes into almost all the rental hotels and condos. In 2005, she and Sandy Fails published Where the Road Ends, a coffee table book about Crested Butte. “I did the business legwork. I was the publishing and marketing sales side of it. I’m not a writer,” she says modestly, although she did contribute an entire chapter. “But it’s fun to be associated with such a talented writer,” she notes of her best friend.

MJ met Sandy when she offered her a proposition, knowing Sandy was home with her son, Chris, and MJ needed a reliable babysitter for Zach. “I called Sandy and said, you don’t know me but would you consider taking care of my son two days a week?” and Sandy said, “No.”

However, a few days later, after considering the offer, Sandy decided to give it a try. So began the relationship of Zach and Chris, who are still very tight friends, and Sandy and MJ in 1988. “I can’t even imagine having a better friend than Sandy. Our sons grew up together and she’s Emma’s godmother,” MJ says.

MJ served on the school board for more than seven years, from 2003 through 2010. “The school district was on financial probation with the state—bad decisions were made for good reasons. It was hard, it was a mess and required so much time and you’re messing with people’s kids, so everybody’s your boss. We had a fantastic group of people who stepped up and joined the board. We had to get out of the financial mess we were in and the community stepped up and passed the mil levy override, which provided $1.2 million to the school budget in the whole school district in 2005. Already the Crested Butte school, which had been built for 350 kids, had started to burst at the seams, so we started working toward expansion, doubling the numbers of classrooms and building an additional gym.”

The 2008 election’s $55 million bond issue passed and doubled the capacity by expanding the CBCS. MJ laughs, “They told us we were crazy. We built this school to accommodate 750 kids and we’re already up over 700. Now the district is looking again at having to do another expansion or build another school. Though I was quite reluctant to ever go on the school board it was truly one of the most rewarding and taxing things I’ve ever done.”

These days, MJ prefers to spend more time inward. “I still try to spend time with friends and family but I spend a lot of time on my own. I’ve gotten quieter. Today, the big change that I actively seek is a slower pace and to take more time with whatever, to not be a part of the frantic, busy world and to be present and appreciate and notice and live each day with gratitude.”

Above all, she cherishes her relationships. “I feel like Crested Butte, although it’s gone through many changes, is still the best place I’ve ever found to foster and support relationships. I’m extraordinarily ordinary,” she thinks, “and this is the most amazing place to be ordinary. Every morning I look out my window and look up Paradise Divide and every day it’s different and every day it’s the same. And that is what fills my soul.”

Community Calendar Thursday, July 19–Wednesday, July 25

THURSDAY 19
• 6-7 a.m. Sunrise Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7-7:45 a.m. Guided Meditation at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 8 a.m. Ecumenical Meditation at UCC.
• 8:30 a.m. Women’s book discussion group at UCC.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Level 2 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9 a.m. Historic Walking Tour at the Crested Butte Heritage Museum.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Vinyasa Level 1/2 at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 10:15-11:30 a.m. Ashtanga Vinyasa / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics Level 1 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 11 a.m. Weekly storytime at Townie Books. 349-7545.
• 11:30 a.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• noon All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Church Community Healing Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• noon-1:15 p.m. Vinyasa Level 1/2 at Yoga for teh Peaceful.
• 12:30-1:15 p.m. Lunchtime Yoga with Leia in the Gunnison Arts Center Dance Studio.
• 3-5 p.m. Watercolor & Wine with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044
• 4-5 p.m. RockAsana at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage, a free thrift store. 300 Belleview, Unit 2, on the south end of 3rd Street. 970-318-6826.
• 4:30-6 p.m. Crested Butte Community Food Bank open at Oh Be Joyful Church. (1st & 3rd Thursday)
• 4:45-6 p.m. Contemporary Dance (ages 12+) with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Yin at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 5:45 p.m. Cardio Dance at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6:10-7:10 p.m. Barre Workout (ages 14+) with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• 6:30 p.m. AA Open Meditation at UCC.
• 6:30-8 p.m. Restorative Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7 p.m. Women Supporting Women Group Discussion at the Nordic Inn.
• 7:15-8:30 p.m. Adult Contemporary Dance with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.
• 8:15-8:45 p.m. Free Meditation / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 p.m. Evening Sadhana / CB Co-op at Town Hall.

FRIDAY 20
• 6-7:15 a.m. Hip Hop Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30 a.m. Adult Ballet Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8 a.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back). 349-6482.
• 8-8:45 a.m. Open Aerial Play with CB School of Dance at the Center for the Arts.
• 8:45 a.m. Core Power Yoga Class at the Pump Room.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Flexibly Challenged / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Prana Vinyasa Level 2/3 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 9:15 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Simple Sketch Series: Clouds with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 10:15-11:30 a.m. Hatha Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Iyengar at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon-1:15 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 1 p.m. Art group meets at the Senior Center. 641-4529.
• 2-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery in the Gunnison Arts Center Clay Studio.
• 2-5 p.m. Open Wheel Throwing in the Gunnison Arts Center Clay Studio.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30 p.m. Friday Night Tennis at the CB Town Courts (thru the end of August.)
• 6-7 p.m. Poi Playshop at the Pump Room.
• 6:30-7:45 p.m. Restorative at Yoga For The Peaceful.

SATURDAY 21
• 7:30 a.m. Open AA at UCC.
• 7:45 a.m. Weights and Indoor Biking Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8-9 a.m. Mindful Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Community Yoga at the Sanctuary Yoga & Pilates Studio, Gunnison.
• 10-11 a.m. Hip Hop Community Dance Class at the Pump Room (above Fire House on 3rd & Maroon). 415-225-5300.
• 10 a.m.-noon Sunflowers & Snacks, family friendly event in the Gunnison Arts Center Clay Studio.
• 10:30 a.m. & 4 p.m. Storytime with Jen Hillebrandt at Townie Books.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage, a free thrift store. 300 Belleview, Unit 2, on the south end of 3rd Street. 970-318-6826.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 6:30-7:30 p.m. Guided Sound Meditation at 405 4th Street.

SUNDAY 22
• 7-8 a.m. Meditation at Yoga for the Peaceful, by donation.
• 7-8:15 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8:30 a.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 8:30 a.m. Oh Be Joyful Church Worship Service at the Center for the Arts outdoor field.
• 9 a.m. Worship Service at Union Congregational Church. 349-6405.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 9:30-11 a.m. Free Community Class / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10 a.m. Oh Be Joyful Church Worship Service at the Center for the Arts outdoor field.
• 10-11:15 a.m. Vin-Yin at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Crested Butte Farmer’s Market on the 1st block of Elk Ave.
• 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Narcotics Anonymous Meeting at UCC, 403 Maroon Ave. Closed meeting for addicts only. (1st & 3rd Sundays)
• 4-5:15 p.m. CBCYC Community Book Club at 405 4th Street.
• 4-5:30 p.m. Reveal – The Creative Process with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 5-6 p.m. All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Eucharist at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• 5-7 p.m. Pick-up Adult Basketball. HS Gym, CBCS.
• 6 p.m. AA meets at UCC.
• 6 p.m. Evening Service at Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, 711 N. Main St., Gunnison.
• 6:30 p.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• 6:30-7:45 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7 p.m. Gamblers Anonymous meets at the Last Resort.
• 7-9 p.m. “Salsa Rueda de Casino” workshop at the Pump Room (3 week, 6 session workshop that runs thru Aug. 1)

MONDAY 23
• 6-7:15 a.m. Hip Hop Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7 a.m. Adult Ballet Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Intro to Ashtanga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8 a.m. Active Isolated Stretching (thru Aug. 22) at Union Congregational Church.
• 8:45 a.m. Mat Mix at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 9:30-10:45 a.m. Adult Ballet Technique with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Iyengar at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 10:50 a.m.-12:20 p.m. Ballet Technique (ages 12+) with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• noon Adult Children of Alcoholics open meeting at Union Congretional Church.
• noon-1 p.m. Gentle Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 12:30-1:45 p.m. Modern Dance (ages 12+) with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• 12:45 p.m. Bridge at the Senior Center. 641-4529.
• 1:30-2:15 p.m. Zumba with Barron Farnell in the Gunnison Arts Center Dance Studio.
• 4 p.m. Hard Hat Tours at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Yin Yoga Nidra at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 5:30-7 p.m. Moms in Motion class at the GVH rehab gym.
• 6-7 p.m. Body Maintenance at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6:30 p.m. WellBeing Connection Workshop at the CB/Mt. CB Chamber of Commerce.
• 6:30-8 p.m. Women’s Domestic Violence Support Group at Project Hope. Childcare available upon request. 641-2712.
• 7:30 p.m. Open AA at UCC. 349-5711.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.

TUESDAY 24
• 6-7 a.m. Sunrise Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7-7:45 a.m. Meditation at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7:30 a.m. AA/Alanon Open at UCC. 349-5711.
• 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Free Co-Working Tuesdays at the ICELab at WSCU.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Level 2 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Mindful Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9 a.m. Historic Walking Tour at the Crested Butte Heritage Museum.
• 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Summer Art Workshop: (ages 11 to 14) Tags & Bags Art at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 10:15-11:30 a.m. Hatha Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics Level 1 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 11:30 a.m. League of Women Voters meeting at 210 W. Spencer in Gunnison.
• noon AA Closed at UCC.
• 1:30-3:30 p.m. Tech Tuesdays at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 2-3:15 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4-5 p.m. Family Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage, a free thrift store. 300 Belleview, Unit 2, on the south end of 3rd Street. 970-318-6826.
• 4-6 p.m. Creativity & Cocktails: Spray & Splash with Spritzers with the Art Studio of the Center of the Arts. 349-7044.
• 4:40-5:40 p.m. Pre-Pointe Conditioning (ages 12+) with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• 5:45-7:15 p.m. Ballet (ages 12+) with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 5:45 p.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-7 p.m. Piyo at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6-8 p.m. Figure Drawing Sessions with live model in Downtown Crested Butte. 349-7228.
• 6-9 p.m. Clay & Cocktails in the Gunnison Arts Center Clay Studio.
• 7 p.m. Alanon meeting at the Last Resort.
• 7-8:30 p.m. Blessing Way Circle support group at Sopris Women’s Clinic. 720-217-3843.
• 7:15-8:30 p.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7:20-7:50 p.m. Pointe Training (ages 12+) with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.

WEDNESDAY 25
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7-8:15 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7:30 a.m. The Crested Butte / Mt. Crested Butte Rotary Club breakfast meeting in the Shavano Conference Room at the Elevation Hotel.
• 8 a.m. Active Isolated Stretching (thru Aug. 22) at Union Congregational Church.
• 8 a.m. T’ai Chi for advanced participants in the northeast corner of Rainbow Park.
• 8:30 a.m. Hike with HCCA. Sign up at hccacb.org.
• 8:45 a.m. Pilates at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9 a.m. T’ai Chi for beginner participants in the northeast corner of Rainbow Park.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 9 a.m.-noon Open Wheel Throwing at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 9:30-10:45 a.m. Kaiut Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Two Buttes Senior Citizens van transportation. Roundtrip to Gunnison. Weather permitting. Call first for schedule and availability. 275-4768.
• 10:30 a.m.-noon Prana Vinyasa Level 2/3 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• 12:15-12:45 p.m. Yoga Nidra Relaxtion at Yoga for the Peaceful. ($5 donation)
• 2-3:15 p.m. Forrest Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 3-5 p.m. Pinot & Van Gogh with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts & the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival. 349-7044.
• 3:30-5 p.m. ICELab tours at Western State College University with Patrick Rowley.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5-10 p.m. Game night at Tassinong Farms, CB South.
• 5:15-6:30 p.m. Jazz Funk with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• 5:30 p.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30 p.m. Prenatal Yoga class in Crested Butte South. 349-1209.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Vinyasa Level 2/3 at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 6:30 p.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back), 4th and Maroon. 349-6482.
• 7-9 p.m. “GriefShare,” a grief recovery seminar and support group, meets at Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, 711 N. Main St., Gunnison. 970-349-7769.
• 7-9 p.m. “Salsa Rueda de Casino” workshop at the Pump Room (3 week, 6 session workshop that runs thru Aug. 1)

 

EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT

THURSDAY 19
WSCU’s Writing the Rockies continues thru July 22, www.western.edu/writing-rockies-annual-conference.
• 7 p.m. Gunrack plays at The Talk of the Town.
• 7 p.m. Floyd Bauer plays at The Princess Wine Bar.
• 7:30 p.m. CBMF: Verdi’s Falstaff at the Center for the Arts.
• 7:30 p.m. Comedy is Hard in the Black Box Theatre of the Gunnison Arts Center.
• 8 p.m. Ladies’ Night at the Red Room.

FRIDAY 20
• 2 p.m. Book signing with Mike Reiss, author of the Simpsons, for his new book Springfield Confidential: Jokes, Secrets and Outright Lies from a Lifetime Writing for the Simpsons at Townie Books.
• 3:50 p.m. Crested Butte Writers’ Network Meet-Up at Writing the Rockies with the Literary Arts Department of the Center of the Arts at Quigley Hall of WSCU. 349-7487.
• 4-7 p.m. Coal Creek Connection plays on the Butte 66 deck.
• 7 p.m. Tyler Hansen plays at The Princess Wine Bar.
• 7:30 p.m. CBMF: Verdi’s Falstaff at the Center for the Arts.
• 8 p.m. Comedy is Hard in the Black Box Theatre of the Gunnison Arts Center.
• 9:30 p.m. Classic Colorado: Michael Martin Murphey at the I Bar Ranch.
• 10 p.m. CBMF: After Dark with Ron Earl at the Center for the Arts.

SATURDAY 21
• 8 a.m.-noon Tom Stillo Round Robin Mixers Memorial Tennis Tournament for advanced participants at the Town Courts with BBQ to follow. 349-5338.
• 5-7 p.m. Artist Reception with Rosalind Cook and Marin Dobson at Rijk’s Family Gallery. 349-5289.
• 6 p.m. Casey Falter plays at Montanya Distillers.
SATURDAY 21 cont’d
• 7:30 p.m. CBMF: Verdi’s Falstaff at the Center for the Arts.
• 8 p.m. DJ Ryan Herr & Mine Control plays at the Public House.

SUNDAY 22
• 8 a.m.-noon Tom Stillo Round Robin Mixers Memorial Tennis Tournament for intermediate participants at the Town Courts with BBQ to follow. 349-5338.
• 3 p.m. Live music on the deck at the Eldo.
• 6-8 p.m. Sundays @ 6: Farmer in the Sky at Legion Park in Gunnison.
• 7 p.m. Jim Sargent plays at The Princess Wine Bar.
• 7:30 p.m. CBMF: The Wild Chamber Music Party at the Center for the Arts.

MONDAY 23
• 5:30 p.m. Alpenglow: Jason Boland & the Stragglers play on the Center for the Arts Outdoor Stage. 349-7487.
• 7 p.m. Paradise Divide plays at The Princess Wine Bar.

TUESDAY 24
• 9 a.m. Coffee with Community with Daniel Bruce, executive director of Six Points, at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 10 a.m.-noon RMBL’s Geology Van Tour with Dr. Amy Ellwein. 349-7420.
• 5:30 p.m. The Chamber’s Business After Hours Mixer at Crested Butte Family Dental. 349-6438.
• 6:30 p.m. Burgers N Brews: I Draw Slow plays at the I Bar Ranch.
• 7 p.m. Public Policy Forum: Bryan Cunningham: How Worried Should I Be?: Separating Fact from Fear on Cybersecurity at the Center for the Arts.
• 7 p.m. Casey Falter plays at The Princess Wine Bar.

WEDNESDAY 25
Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival begins and runs thru July 29. www.cbwineandfood.com.
• 5:30-9 p.m. Live! from Mt. Crested Butte: LowDown Brass Band plays on the Red Lady Stage at CBMR.
• 5:45 p.m. Powerade Pinnacle gO Ride Series at Evolution Bike Park at CBMR.
• 7 p.m. RMBL’s Open House at the Mt. CB Town Hall to discuss the potential of a Mt. CB Campus.
• 7 p.m. Music on Maroon at the Union Congregational Church.
• 8 p.m. CBMF: Gypsy Jazz Goes South: Hot Club in Latin and South America at the Center for the Arts.
• 8 p.m. Ladies’ Night at The Talk of the Town.
• 9:30 p.m. Classic Colorado: Sawyer Brown at the I Bar Ranch.

 

KID’S CALENDAR

THURSDAY 19
• 9 a.m.-noon Dance Camp! (ages 3-5) with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class in the High Altitude Dance Academy in Gunnison.
• 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Art Babies & Toddler Art (ages 0-4) at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 3:30-4:30 p.m. Contemporary Dance (ages 9-11) with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.

FRIDAY 20
• 9-9:45 a.m. Art ‘n Dance (ages 2-3 w/ caregiver) at the Gunnison Arts Center Outdoor Courtyard.
• 9 a.m.-noon Aerial Dance Camp! (ages 6-11) with CB School of Dance at the Center for the Arts.
• 10-10:45 a.m. Art ‘n Dance (ages 4-6) at the Gunnison Arts Center Outdoor Courtyard.
• 11 a.m. Big Kids Storytime (ages 3-7) at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 1:30 p.m. Little Minds (ages 3-7) at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 4-5 p.m. Tang Soo Do Martial Arts classes for youth with West Elk Martial Arts, Town Hall Fitness Room. 901-7417.

SATURDAY 21
• 10 a.m.-noon Kids Plein Air Watercolor single day class at the Gunnison Arts Center.

MONDAY 23
• 3:45-5 p.m. Messy Mondays at the Crested Butte Library. (ages 5-12, kids 8 and under must be accompanied by an adult)
• 4-5 p.m. Kids Yoga (ages 8 & under) at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.

TUESDAY 24
• 9 a.m.-noon Dance Camp! (ages 3-5) with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• 1-2:30 p.m. Mud Puppies Clay Camp (ages 5-7) in the Gunnison Arts Center Clay Studio.
• 3:30-4:30 p.m. Ballet (ages 9-11) with CB School of Dance in the Pump Room Dance Studio.
• 3:30-5:30 p.m. Mud Makers Clay Camp (ages 8-12) in the Gunnison Arts Center Clay Studio.

WEDNESDAY 25
• 9 a.m.-noon Aerial Dance Camp! (ages 6-11) with CB School of Dance at the Center for the Arts.
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music and Dance Class in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. 349-9639.
• 11 a.m. Baby & Toddler Literacy Time at the Crested Butte Library.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4-5 p.m. Kids Yoga (ages 8+) at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 4:15-5:15 p.m. Kids Yoga (ages 8 and under) at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.