Wednesday, October 23, 2019

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Of pancakes, parades and pride in paradise

By Dawn Belloise

Liberty has never come from the government. Liberty has always come from the subjects of it. The history of liberty is a history of resistance.” —Woodrow Wilson

What better way to kick off the Fourth of July shindig than with an all American Crested Butte tradition—PANCAKES! First things first on this illustrious holiday: To sustain your energy throughout the many events all day, you’ll need to load up the calories. From 7 to 10:30 a.m. on the celebrated day, the Crested Butte Fire and EMS Squad at the Fire Station, 306 Maroon Avenue, will be flipping those pan-cookies, along with sausages and fixins’. It’s advisable to get there early because it gets packed as the crew serves flapjacks to more than 1,200 people. That’s probably more than 2,400 pancakes (who can eat just one?).

Crested Butte is especially known for its community-wide Fourth celebrations and outrageous parades. Throughout its history, Crested Butte’s local population has put on a spectacle of creatively wacky floats and processions that border on the preposterous and always in good humor. In times past, the parade was small enough that it went up Elk Avenue and then reversed for a repeat performance in the opposite direction.

Locals will gather for days before the parade to create their costumes and floats. Some of the more innovative ones in the past included the ski jump packed with snow on the back of a truck, created by former town mayor Alan Bernholtz who bedazzled the crowd by hucking himself down the jump in full disco threads with his wig hat on his head. Then there was Alan’s daring bike jump through a hoop of fire, and his water slide during another parade, all on the back of a truck. Another float that awed the masses was Tucker Roberts doing full back layout on a trampoline while the float was moving. Then there was the time when Burt Rentals would ride snowmobiles in the parade with wheel attachments on the skis. And who can forget Tony Wildman in an American flag g-string on a horse?

In the earlier days of wildness, during the bicentennial parade of 1976, the scandalous Red, White & Blue Girls used only paint as their costumes. Most of them were topless, some were completely naked, and some of the crowd didn’t even realize the infamous troupe had only body paint on for the now-legendary tribute to freedom of speech.

Long-standing floats and groups to watch for are the Red Ladies, the wild sisters who represent the spirit of Red Lady Mountain—aka, Mount Emmons—in the town’s battle to keep a molybdenum mine from desecrating the sentinel, with the High Country Conservation Advocates leading the fight.

There’s the Flauschink Royal Has-Beens who follow the current Flauschink King and Queen in their Royal Chariot.

The hippest of funkiness belongs to the effervescent, groovin’ KBUT float with its disco dancers and mirror ball, hosting the chosen King and Queen of Soul.

The ecologists and biologists at Rocky Mountain Biological Labs (RMBL) in Gothic are brilliant researchers and scientists who work hard and let their hair down for Independence Day. It’s the only day they get off during their intensive summer work.

The RMBL folks in all their greenery have been favorites in the parade for as long as they’ve been marching. They come with spears and pots and pans, whistles and bells and wild primitive faces that tell of being in the sun too much, alone with plants, insects and marmots. They live under the towering cathedral spires of Gothic Mountain until the flora dies and snow threatens, but for one hot summer day in July, they costume up, wearing only corn lily leaves, which they sew together themselves. Marching in their outfits that conjure up images of crazed aboriginal biologists, they proudly chant and stomp their way up the parade route. In past years, after marching through to the end of the Elk, they’d walk backwards down the avenue, but these days, the parade is too big for that.

Current Crested Butte mayor Jim Schmidt—aka “Deli”—has been in town for the celebration every year since 1977. Having served as mayor in the past as well as on Town Council for well over two decades, he says of his 1995 brainstorm, “I decided that what the council should do was scoop up the horse poop in the parade. How could a Town Council be of better service to their community than slinging poop? I thought it was very symbolic.” He laughs about the past tradition that no longer exists since there are no horses in the parade anymore, but he adds that both tourists and locals got the message back in the day.

Deli feels the holiday is so special in the Butte because everybody gets to celebrate it in their own way and as for the parade, “There are no boundaries as to what you can put into the parade as far as floats. It’s freedom of expression and that’s what the Fourth is all about. A few years back, there was a move to ban political statements in the parade but the Fourth is a political holiday. We rebelled… That’s what we’re celebrating. That’s why I think if somebody makes a statement, whatever the statement is, it’s cool that they’re in there even if I don’t agree with it.”

Deli reflected on some of the parade aspects he misses, as times changed and the town grew. “I was disappointed when we stopped running the parade both ways… it was so short.” He remembers the parade getting to the Four-way Stop and turning around to march back up Elk Avenue. “It was like a snake that ate itself because they would take it around the block and suddenly you’d run into the other people coming back up. But it just got too long. Pretty amazing that we’ve never had a real marching band in the parade. There’s been the boom box band from KBUT and RMBL sort of band with their kazoos, chanting, and pots and pans.”

Deli reflects the sentiments of most in this valley when he says, “The whole tradition and people are all so great.”

A procession such as we have needs an interpreter, a liaison between the audience and the crazies marching up Elk Avenue. Than Acuff took the reins of announcer in 2013 from Denis Hall, who had been injecting his own style of emcee for 30 years. “I have no idea why Denis picked me,” Than shrugs and smiles in an interview a year ago. “It was a surprise and an honor. I’ve announced at a bunch of sports events and I’m comfortable with a microphone in my hand. Denis was my Fourth of July emcee sensei and I think because I’m sober, he figured I wouldn’t totally screw things up.”

KBUT deejay Josephine Kellett offered to jump up there and co-emcee with Than and now the duo rocks the parade. “I thought it would be great to have a woman’s energy up there and she provides the necessary sass,” Than says, and describes his favorite thing about announcing. “Being a part of one of the longest standing traditions in Crested Butte and seeing the same people year in and year out, whether they’re visitors or locals cruising down Elk, either in the parade or in crowd.”

And then, there’s the Twinkies. “People throw Twinkies at me… I love Twinkies. I put them in my bike pack and eat them on a big ride,” he laughs.

After the parade, there’s a much anticipated and refreshing water fight at the west end of Elk Avenue where the Crested Butte Fire Department brings in the big guns and revelers bring out their arsenal of semi-automatic super-soaker blasters. There was a time when the water fights took place all over downtown but they’re now limited to the first block of Elk, so if you aren’t a water baby, it is recommended that you stay away from that area or be considered as fair game. If you’re going into Kochevar’s for the traditional high noon tequila shot, you’d better be speedy in getting through the tossed buckets of water, blasters and hoses.

Crested Butte’s parade and celebration are eccentrically different from anywhere else, mostly because of the community of locals who make the town as funky as it still is. It’s always been more of a carnival atmosphere, because we’re just a town inhabited by kids of all ages. It continues yearly, the youthful, rogue energy of a typical Crested Butte Fourth of July parade and rest assured, it’s not likely to go conservative in our lifetime or lose its wild innovative spirit, despite Vail’s purchase of the ski resort. So don your most independent spirit and head out into the streets. Go Fourth and enjoy!

Benchtalk: June 29, 2018

Happy Birthday America!

Believe it or not the Fourth of July is on the horizon. It is a busy week up here at 9,000 feet. Live music, lectures, parades and pancakes are all part of the fun. So get out and enjoy a summer holiday week in Crested Butte! But remember that there is a fire ban in place throughout the county. So no outdoor campfires or even smoking in the backcountry is allowed. It is pretty crispy out there so be careful!

Coburn wins another national title

Former Crested Butte Titan athlete and current New Balance professional runner Emma Coburn just won her seventh national title in the 3,000-meter steeplechase at the USTAF championships last weekend edging out the win with a time of 9:17.70.

Drag Your Butte to the Fabulous Cabaret

The Crested Butte Mountain Theater, in collaboration with the Crested Butte Library, will host Drag Your Butte to the Fabulous Cabaret on Friday, June 29 at the Mallardi Cabaret Theater. A night of fabulous fun, this event is 21+ and costumes are encouraged.

Your Drag Queens for the evening are Coco Jem Holiday, Donatella Mysecrets, and Nina Symone from Grand Junction. Tickets are available online at www.cbmountaintheater.org, for $18 online presale, $20 cash at the door. Doors open at 8 p.m., and the show begins at 9 p.m.

Get black and white this Saturday at the museum

Join the Crested Butte Mountain Heritage Museum for the 16th Annual Black & White Ball on Saturday, June 30, from 6 to 10 p.m. Once again, you will see tents up for this annual block party on the corner of Fourth Street and Elk Avenue. Listen to the New Mexico-based Americana Zydeco band Felix y Los Gatos as you enjoy appetizers provided by Ayla and Ian Scott’s Grease and Glitter Catering. Tickets for members are $25 and non-members $30. You can buy event tickets online at crestedbuttemuseum.com or by calling the museum at 349-1880.

Bookstore happening

Mountain Gazette Author Jane Parnell to read and sign at Townie Books on Saturday June 30th at 4pm. Jane Parnell’s Off Trail: Finding My Way Home in the Colorado Rockies is an inspiring memoir about surmounting challenges, including the highest peaks in the Colorado Rockies. A special Storytime Event is also happening Saturday. BEES will be at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, June 30 at Townie Books. To reserve your spot call (970) 349-7545.

GAC Cabaret “Sugar and Spice, Naughty and Nice”

Get yourself a cocktail and settle in for an evening of song and dance—ranging from spicy to sweet, naughty to very nice—in a cabaret setting at the Gunnison Arts Center, for “Sugar and Spice, Naughty and Nice,” June 29 and 30. Doors open at 7:30, and the curtain goes up at 8 p.m. You’ll laugh and love this locally produced talent held in the GAC Dance Studio, cabaret style. Directed by Enid Holden, with accompaniment by Julia Wilson, and MC by William Spicer. Appropriate for ages 18+. Tickets are $20 per person.

Birthdays:

June 28- Kevin Beltz, Alicia Lypps, Pi DuVal, Braillyn Krill, Matthew Holze, Xavier Fane

June 29- Ben Sweitzer

June 30- Jeff Duke, James O’Connor, Thomas Rutherford

July 1- Patricia Dawson, Michael Garren, Eric Ross, Shea Hillman, Amber Orton, Liz Berry

July 2- Jackie Ingham, Glo Cunningham, Anne Campbell, William Johnson, Monica Arias, Caitlin de Compiegne

July 3- Nathan Bilow, Sandy Shea

July 4- Molly Eldridge, America, Michelle Zanga, Jesse Gerber, Samantha Merck, Jeff Westling

 

STASH STAFF: The Secret Stash has a large staff for the summer, but like most local businesses, is still seeking employees to meet the busy demands.
CELEBRATION OF LIFE: Friends, family, and community came together to celebrate the amazing life of Tom Stillo as a photographer, volleyball legend, skier, avid tennis and pickle ball player. The ceremony was held on Saturday, June 23 at the Crested Butte Mountain Resort Base Area and included celebrants throwing personalized tennis balls into the air.
THE ART STUDIO: Along with multiple other art galleries, The Art Studio hosted a reception for some local artists on Saturday, June 23rd. Pictured above are artists Laura Elm (left), Peggy Morgan Stenmark (middle), and Judith Cassel-Mamet (Right).

 

Cameos: How are you celebrating independence day?

Family, food, and fireworks.
Allen Vinyard
Toasting the fireworks in Oklahoma.
Mary Ann Bulla
Missing Crested Butte.
Raquel Cortina
Family
Mary Alice and Gabriela Ribeiro
Drinking B Heavies with
the boys.
Freedom McNallie

Avalanche wins 2018 softball season opener

OH MY GOD! OH MY GOD! OH…MY…GOD!

by Than Acuff

What do we do? One could get on Facebook and comment about how the Vail buyout will affect the cost of living and impending increased lack of affordability or, one could go to work and try and make some money to be able to afford to live here.

But that’s not why we moved here, to work to be able to afford to live here.

Although… I gotta be honest. How sick would it be if they ran a gondola from the East River Valley floor to the peak of Crested Butte Mountain? There would be two stations along the way where you could load/unload. One at the Paradise Warming House and another at a warming house on top of Paradise Cliffs so we can enjoy our Brie and Chardonnay while watching groms launch Paradise Cliffs before continuing up to a rotating restaurant on the summit for 360-degree views. Plus, we could host World Cup races that start on top of the Headwall.

My armchair assessment of the situation is that Vail wanted Okemo and Sunapee because they want a larger presence in the Northeast, an area where more than 55 million people live. They just had to take Crested Butte, an area where 10,000 people live, as part of the deal and we will remain the redheaded stepchild resort, which I’m okay with. Sure, we get ignored while the other kids get more attention but we also get away with more as a result because no one is paying attention. One potential benefit to us: If you follow the trickle-down economic theory made famous during the Reagan era, the gear is going to get that much better at the annual Crested Butte Snowsports Ski Swap and I will benefit.

I put the ass in assessment, though.

One thing I am paying attention to is the local softball leagues, which just opened another season on Tuesday, June 5. It’s the same local softball league that was here when Dick Eflin and Fred Rice started this ski resort. It’s the same softball league that thrived when the Callaways owned the resort. The same softball leagues that remained when the Muellers took over and the same softball leagues that will continue while Vail is in town.

With that, the 2018 season opened Tuesday, June 5 at fields throughout town and what better way to open the summer of softball then catching some single-wall small-ball action at Pitsker Field.

And oh, what an opening it was. Grills were grilling, beer was flowing, tunes were blaring and Alec Lindeman, aka Bobby Digital, nailed the National Anthem on the microphone.

Oh, the rocket’s red glare!

Not to mention Michael Villanueva, proud father of both Koa and newborn son Rio, tossing out the first pitch.

“I guess it was because I almost died.”

Unfortunately, the game didn’t quite live up to the pregame hype as the Avalanche eked out a 5-4 win over the latest addition to the local softball ranks, the Eleven.

The Eleven is a mix of some new faces and old to the league with a core group of linchpin players. Aforementioned linchpin players such as Andrea Schumacher and Ryan Kay, who each connected for base hits to drive in runs for a 2-0 Eleven lead.

Now the Avalanche is the same ol’ same ol’, except for Mark Reaman, who has opted out of the 2018 season. Yet there’s no shortage of talent on that team as Reaman’s kids, Ben and Sam, remain on the team along with their friends, bringing a wealth of youthful talent to the team once again. The Weil family is on for another season as well, as are the Chlipalas, and Jim Schmidt returns to pace the sidelines in what appears to be a war of attrition between Schmidt and Ronco as to who will have the most years of softball seasons in Crested Butte.

Sam Reaman led off the bottom of the first with a double and scored when Adrienne Weil rapped a double through the infield. Nolan Blunck and Maggie Dethloff combined for back-to-back powerbunt singles to load the bases and Mikey Weil scored two, stroking a grounder up the middle for a 3-2 lead.

Billy Watson and Reaman combined for two base hits in the bottom of the second inning and Blunck added a little sauce to his bat to knock a two RBI double for a 5-2 lead.

The Eleven bats showed some more life in the top of the fourth inning when Ryan Kay led off with a triple high off the fence in left and scored on a double by Josh Schumacher. Katy Kay punched a sac hit to advance Schumacher to third, and a single to shallow right by Grant VanHoose pushed Schumacher home to pull the Eleven to within one.

By the fifth inning the excitement of opening day had worn off as neither team could manage any offense the remaining two innings and the Avalanche did just enough to seal the 5-4 win.

By the way, Vail buying Crested Butte is not the end of the world. But, when the end of the world does come, and it will, cockroaches will be playing softball using plastic bags as gloves and plastic bottles as bats while eating Twinkies, and I will be there to cover it.

This is (still) not Vail and you still get to be CB real

So much for the plan to write all summer about the change this place is seeing. That went away with the announcement that the granddaddy of all change just happened. When we woke up Monday we weren’t as cool as we were when we fell asleep Sunday. That’s just what happens when world ski resort behemoth Vail Resorts buys our cool, little but extreme CBMR ski resort at the end of the road. It did confirm every “CBMR Just Sold to Vail” rumor headline and April Fool’s story we have written the last 30 years. Told you!

Let’s be honest: Being part of the Vail corporate conglomerate chips away at the patina of funky ski town independence. There was a certain melancholy, if not downright panic, shock and hostility at the news on Monday. Social media went nuts as some of the mid-timers expressed disbelief that they have to sell the Subaru and buy a Lexus under the new Vail rules that go into effect this fall. Some of the oldsters kept parroting the platitude that “change is the only constant” before ducking punches from the kids who grew up here with a unique mountain town pride.

Let’s be honest: Our pointed laccolith is no longer under the management of a mom-and-pop family-owned ski resort. And honestly there is good and bad that come with that change. There will be money for ski area improvements—maybe the torn seats get replaced before November. Maybe the chairlifts run a bit more smoothly. Perhaps the ski patrol has the resources in money, manpower and explosives to get the steeps open earlier. Teo-2 might happen in a year instead of seven. Waffles might not be the biggest draw at the base area that folds up after 6 o’clock and maybe they can figure out how to change the spring scent at the Paradise lift line, but I’m not sure even Vail has that much money.

What Vail bought was a ski business, after all, and they haven’t been afraid to spend money to make the ski experience better for guests. The guests who come here come for the Crested Butte terrain and character, and that means the steeps. That is good for those of us still skiing.

The biggest difference might be speed and money. Vail likes to spend money that makes money and they will apparently do it fast—at least, fast for us where nothing is ever fast. So they’ll throw green into the product and bucks into marketing. The winter crowds that the Muellers and Callaways only dreamed about will likely be enticed here pretty quickly. What would have taken the Muellers a decade to accomplish in terms of skier days will probably take Vail a season or two. Goodbye, midweek private ski area. Hello, better ski mountain.

Let’s be honest: It is business. Vail bought a ski business. They didn’t buy you, so I don’t get some of the panic. To take the Vail executives at their word—as most of us do in this small town until proven otherwise—they like what Crested Butte is. They like the slightly outlaw, individualistic feel and plan to offer that as an alternative to their growing clientele. In business parlance, the corporate ski area wants to capitalize on the value of the Crested Butte brand. It is real, quirky, a bit more duct tape than fresh fur. It is Patagonia instead of Bogner. It is the Grateful Dead instead of Kenny G. It is Body Bag and Funnel instead of the Back Bowls. The Vail VP rightfully pointed out they already own a Vail in the portfolio and don’t need a mini-Vail that is hard to get to. Real is the key. If someone treats you as a prop in this authentic ski town, my guess is they’ll get a harsh dose of authenticity.

On another business note, did I mention that if you own property you probably saw a pop in your value this week? Internet research says prices could rise more than 20 percent following such a deal. The price of free-market houses in the valley ain’t going down. That may be good for homeowners but not so good for those hoping to raise a middle class family somewhere near Crested Butte in the future.

Let’s be honest: We are moving to a land of more. There will be more people coming. It will take more money to own a home here. There could be more need for parking lots. There will be more lift lines and lines in general. But waiters and bartenders should make more money. Businesses should see more bottom-line profit and be able to not sweat the offseason as much. Maybe there will be more and easier flights from Gunni that benefit everyone. Governments might want to soon consider more regs that keep the scale of the valley intact and find an equitable way for big second homes to contribute to small employee housing.

Let’s be honest: This place is about the people, and the people weren’t part of the purchase contract. The Chainless Race will still go on and the Al Johnson shouldn’t go away. How “interesting” do you think the Vinotok fire will be this year? Weed will still waft from the chair in front of you and Mountain Express buses will continue to be rolling pieces of art. You can still be weird and the black sheep of your family. You don’t have to suddenly wear Gucci, and duct tape will still be a regular addition on ski pants and Kincos. The “Gone Skiing” signs can still go up on a powder day and we can all still argue about dog poop bags or snowbanks on Elk Avenue.

Yeah—it will probably be different in a few years. But it’s the new resort executives who will have to adjust to the different as well. They get to see and experience a real, sometimes crusty, independent ski town attitude. They say that’s what they want. They are fortunate to have come into a community with the attitude of a ski town at the end of the road that is still not easy to get to and draws a different breed of character. It attracts refugees, crazed young powder hounds, barflies, poets, dancers, middle-aged bikers, senior-citizen shredders and people who care a little less about what the world thinks of them. Authenticity.

Every time I go to another resort and the workers hear we are from Crested Butte, they get a faraway look in their eye and whisper that they would love to live in Crested Butte. My kids’ college friends from Breckenridge and Summit are blown away by this community and its authentic small-town vibe with no stoplight, no Starbucks, the crazy lost and found on KBUT and trails you can hit 30 seconds from the one main street that is filled with colorful buildings and even more colorful local business owners. And whether the new corporate owners like it or not (and I think they will like it), that is what they get as part of this deal. That is what you will continue to have, a chance to shape and celebrate and share with the new corporate execs who just might suddenly understand what burning a Grump means and have a life-changing moment.

Maybe we are as cool as we were last Sunday. It’s still the end of the road after all.

—Mark Reaman

Benchtalk: June 8, 2018

Vail parade

Just like when the Muellers purchased the ski resort, the town of Crested Butte is planning a champagne welcome parade for the Vail board of directors once the contract closes. Just kidding.

Crested Butte Town Picnic Friday, June 8 at noon 

But the town will be holding a community picnic this Friday at Rainbow Park. Join the town of Crested Butte in a community gathering to celebrate the start of summer. Enjoy free burgers and hot dogs, games and activities, and information about improving your home’s resource efficiency. A community photo will be taken at 1 p.m. Bring a dessert or side to share, and help us keep our environmental footprint small by also bringing your own cups, plates, and silverware.

Summer Mountain Express schedule begins this weekend

The Town Shuttle will begin operating on the 20-minute Summer Schedule on Saturday, June 9. The Summer Schedule will run daily, from 7:35 a.m. until midnight, through Sunday, September 30. The Gothic Bus begins operating on Monday, June 11. Buses depart the Four-way Stop in CB at 8:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. If you have any questions, visit the website at www.mtnexp.org, or contact Mountain Express at (970) 349-5616.

Stepping Stones garden party fundraiser

Come out to a Garden Party Fundraiser on Saturday, June 9 at 704 Whiterock Ave, the home of the Verdecchia family, (formerly the Claim Jumper). This event will be held from 3-6 p.m. and proceeds will benefit Stepping Stones Children’s Center. Vegetable and flower plants and starts will be for sale, along with custom garden themed cookies and cakes, mosaic stepping stones, hand painted planters, garden starter kits from Rocky Mountain Trees, hanging baskets, seeds, a lawn care consultation certificate with Keep it Green, cut flowers, and much more!

Go to the museum for free on June 14

The Crested Butte Mountain Heritage Museum invites the Gunnison Valley Community to view our newest exhibits for free on Thursday, June 14th, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The newest exhibits include Crested Butte 1960s Counterculture: Coming Together, The Jokerville Mine, and Exploring the Gunnison Valley: The 1873 Hayden Survey.

Birthdays:

June 7- Hasley Ralph, Jenny Clifford, Kate Mailly, Lori Mannella

June 8- Steve “Popcorn” Shaffer, Ron Chlipala, Lisa Sacco, Melissa Harrington

June 9- Kirk Apt, Brad English, Bobby Gordon, Taylor Zurmuhlen, Taj and Skylar Crawford, Sean Riley

June 10- T.J. Campbell, Shelley Jordi, Ben Preston, Stephen Mabry

June 11- Jill Clair, Peter Bogardus, Lisa Holes, Jay Sunter, Evan Kezsbom

June 12- Hunter Gaither, Jane Thomas, Billy Rankin, Tyler Cappellucci

June 13- Bruce Cozadd, Buddy Ramstetter, Isaac Huxley Sorock, Aaron Tomcak

 

FEATHERS PETALS SCALES: Spencer Mahaffey Lightfoot featured her paintings in the Piper Gallery at the Center for the Arts and hosted an artist opening on Friday, June 1.

 

CONGRATULATIONS: Ariel Passarelli and Josh Noreen were married August 12, 2017 at the Club at Crested Butte.

 

COFFEE WITH COMMUNITY: Scott Truex, Executive Director, and Anthony Poponi, Special Projects Manager, for the Gunnison Valley RTA were guests at the Crested Butte Old Rock Library on Thursday, May 31.

 

Cameos: What is and will always be uniquely Crested Butte?

Hanging baskets and people arguing over who’s lived here longer.
Tyler Hansen
Alfredo.
Ruby Laemmel
Lifelong locals.
Maggie Chlipala
Softball.
Jennie Villanueva
Go big or go home.
Dave White

Benchtalk: June 1, 2018

Spencer Lightfoot Opening Art Reception is Friday, June 1

Since moving back to Colorado three years ago Spencer Lightfoot’s focus has been on the plants and animals that surround her. She would have never guessed in a million years that she would be fascinated by painting chickens and fish. But she is. All of this is represented in her watercolor mosaics. Fracturing the images into abstract representations, she delights in finding the right palette that lays somewhere between technicolor and reality. Her show runs through June 4 at the Piper Gallery with the opening reception taking place Friday, June 1 from 6 to 8 p.m.

The library’s newest monthly program: Community Crafters

If you are a craftaholic, plan to come to the newest monthly program at the Crested Butte Library on Tuesday, June 5 at 7 p.m. for Community Crafters. This event is free and open to the public and to crafters of all flavors—sewing, knitting, drawing, whatever creative outlet you may enjoy. You can work on a community craft project to make Boomerang Bags for Sustainable Crested Butte. There will be sewing machines, fabric, instructions and more. You’re encouraged to bring your own WIP (work in progress) and come work on your own craft, join the community crafting project, or just grab a coloring sheet and converse with other creatives at the library. Call (970) 349-6535 for more information.

Free class for home buyers in early June

The Gunnison Valley Regional Housing Authority is sponsoring a home-buyer class for those interested in learning the ins and outs of how to buy a home. The class is free to all attendees and will be held the evenings of June 4 and June 5 from 5 to 9 p.m. at the Crested Butte Town Hall at 500 Maroon Avenue. You must register by June 1. Registration forms can be found at www.gvrha.org under the “GVRHA Documents” tab. Attendance both nights is necessary to obtain a certificate of completion, which gets you one additional entry into upcoming housing lotteries. Food and drinks will be provided.

Marimba Music Workshop at GAC

Learn the uplifting music of Zimbabwe in a fun summer morning workshop taught by local troupe members from Marimba Mu Gomo and Barbara Haas at the Gunnison Arts Center on Saturday, June 2 from 10 a.m. to noon. The instruction will be tailored to all skill levels. The workshop will be held outside on the GAC courtyard (or inside, depending on weather). Please bring a hat, sunscreen, water and a small snack. The workshop fee is $25 for adults and $20 for those aged 18 and under. Also, see Marimba MuGomo play live at the First Friday ArtWalk & Music at the Courtyard stage on June 1 from 5 to 7:30 p.m.

June 2-3 is free-fishing weekend

Fishing is free this weekend and for those who live in southwest Colorado there are literally hundreds of places to drop a worm, cast a spinner or launch a fly. The free-fishing weekend, June 2 and June 3, sponsored by Colorado Parks and Wildlife, gives everyone a chance to get out on lakes, reservoirs and rivers to renew their love for the sport. In the Gunnison area go to Spring Creek Reservoir, located on Forest Service Road 744 in the Gunnison-Uncompahgre National Forest; Taylor Park Reservoir, located on Forest Service Road 742, in the Gunnison-Uncompahgre National Forest; or Blue Mesa Reservoir, located on U.S. Highway 50 between Montrose and Gunnison.

Birthdays:

May 31- Nancy Serfas, Ceci Ervin, Robbie Vandervoort, Rayne Gainous, Steve Dobbin, Jim Brenny, Tom Jackson, Tom Rudder, Alice Jennison

June 1- Tim White, Beth Edmiston

June 2- Ted Bosler, Zach Knoll, Edie Shuman-Gibson

June 3- Rosie Gebhart, Jean Bell-Dumas, Anna Aronovic, Elizabeth Bond

June 4- Mark Alling, Gary Sprung, Veronica Walton, Jordan Preston, Ben Barney

June 5- Jim Murry, Karen Saeger, Nathan Schield, Talie Morrison, Adele Bachman, Chris Sharpe, Max Lamb, Robin Cheney, Dave Carbonetti, Patti Kaech, Mary Lass, Rebecca Susan Ofstedahl, Carie O’Neal, Abby Norton

June 6- Paris Lumb, Ellyn Houghton, Toby Rippetoe

MEET AND GREET: Colorado State Senator Kerry Donovan met with the public at Rumors on Thursday, May 24.

 

FILM PREMIER: Russy Baby Productions presented a screening of North For Anthracite: The Crested Butte Branch on Thursday, May 24 at the Crested Butte Old Rock Library.

 

NEW WELCOME SIGN: Tucker Roberts created the new sign to welcome visitors to Crested Butte Mountain Resort’s base area. The location of the sign formerly belonged to Mt. Crested Butte, but has been given to CBMR for their purposes.

 

Cameos: WHAT HOBBY DO YOU WISH WAS YOUR CAREER?

Moonwalking
Donnie Davol
Volleyball
Ella Reamer
Writing
Luke Czaja
I already have making potato chips as my career!
Megan Reamer
I’m lucky because my hobby is my career: making nails look good!
Whitney Favor

Community calendar Thursday, May 3–Wednesday, May 9

THURSDAY 3
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8 a.m. Ecumenical Meditation at UCC.
• 8-9:15 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8:30 a.m. Women’s book discussion group at UCC.
• 8:45 a.m. Indoor Biking at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9:30-10:45 a.m. Forrest Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 11 a.m. Weekly storytime at Townie Books. 349-7545.
• 11:30 a.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• noon All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Church Community Healing Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• noon-1 p.m. BUTI Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 12:30-1:30 p.m. Lunchtime Yoga with Leia in the Gunnison Arts Center Dance Studio.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage, a free thrift store. 300 Belleview, Unit 2, on the south end of 3rd Street. 970-318-6826.
• 4:30-6 p.m. Crested Butte Community Food Bank open at Oh Be Joyful Church. (1st & 3rd Thursday)
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Vin-Yin Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Hatha Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 5:30-7:30 p.m. Stained Glass for Beginners (Thursdays through May 31) at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 5:45 p.m. Zumba at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 5:45-7 p.m. Freestyle Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Kundalini Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6:30 p.m. AA Open Meditation at UCC.
• 7 p.m. Women Supporting Women Group Discussion at the Nordic Inn.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.

FRIDAY 4
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30 a.m. Barre Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8 a.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back). 349-6482.
• 8:45 a.m. Core Power Yoga Class at the Pump Room.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Yoga for the Flexibly Challenged / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Iyengar Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon-1:15 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon-1 p.m. Kundalini / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 1 p.m. Art group meets at the Senior Center. 641-4529.
• 4:30-5:30 p.m. Happy Hour Yoga at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 6-7 p.m. Poi Playshop at the Pump Room.

SATURDAY 5
• 7:30 a.m. Open AA at UCC.
• 7:45 a.m. Weights and Indoor Biking Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Community Yoga at the Sanctuary Yoga & Pilates Studio, Gunnison.
• 9-10 a.m. Mindful Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9:30-10:45 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 10-10:30 a.m. Questions & Freetime / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10-11 a.m. Hip Hop Community Dance Class at the Pump Room (above Fire House on 3rd & Maroon). 415-225-5300.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage, a free thrift store. 300 Belleview, Unit 2, on the south end of 3rd Street. 970-318-6826.
• 2-5 p.m. Mother’s Day Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 6:30-7:30 p.m. Guided Sound Meditation at 405 4th Street.

SUNDAY 6
• 7-8 a.m. Meditation at Yoga for the Peaceful, by donation.
• 8:30 a.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 9 a.m. Worship Service at Union Congregational Church. 349-6405.
• 9 a.m. Worship Service at Oh Be Joyful Church.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 9:30-11 a.m. Free Community Class / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10-11:15 a.m. Vin-Yin at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Narcotics Anonymous Meeting at UCC, 403 Maroon Ave. Closed meeting for addicts only. (1st & 3rd Sundays)
• 4-5:15 p.m. CBCYC Community Book Club at 405 4th Street.
• 5-6 p.m. All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Eucharist at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• 5-7 p.m. Pick-up Adult Basketball. HS Gym, CBCS.
• 6 p.m. AA meets at UCC.
• 6 p.m. Evening Service at Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, 711 N. Main St., Gunnison.
• 6:30 p.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• 6:30-7:45 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7 p.m. Gamblers Anonymous meets at the Last Resort.

MONDAY 7
• 6-7:15 a.m. Sunrise Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7 a.m. Barre Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Pranayama and Namaskars / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Intro to Ashtanga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8:45 a.m. Pilates at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Adult Children of Alcoholics open meeting at Union Congretional Church.
• 12:45 p.m. Bridge at the Senior Center. 641-4529.
• 2-3:15 p.m. Hatha Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4-5:30 p.m. Wisdom Women Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30-7 p.m. Moms in Motion class at the GVH rehab gym.
• 5:45 p.m. Boot Camp at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Yin Yoga Nidra at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6-9 p.m. Intro to Wheel Throwing – Single Day Class in the Gunnison Arts Center Clay Studio.
• 6:30 p.m. WellBeing Connection Workshop at the CB/Mt. CB Chamber of Commerce.
• 6:30-8 p.m. Women’s Domestic Violence Support Group at Project Hope. Childcare available upon request. 641-2712.
• 7:30 p.m. Open AA at UCC. 349-5711.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.

TUESDAY 8
• 6-7 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful, by donation.
• 6:30-7:45 a.m. Intro to Ashtanga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30 a.m. AA/Alanon Open at UCC. 349-5711.
• 8-9:15 a.m. Intro to Ashtanga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Free Co-Working Tuesdays at the ICELab at WSCU.
• 8:45 a.m. Indoor Biking at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Mindful Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 11:30 a.m. League of Women Voters meeting at 210 W. Spencer in Gunnison.
• noon AA Closed at UCC.
• noon-1 p.m. Yoga for Flexibly Challenged / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunchtime Yoga with Leia in the Gunnison Arts Center Dance Studio.
• 1:30-3:30 p.m. Tech Tuesdays at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 2-3 p.m. Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage, a free thrift store. 300 Belleview, Unit 2, on the south end of 3rd Street. 970-318-6826.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:45 p.m. All Levels Yoga at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-7 p.m. Piyo at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6-8 p.m. Figure Drawing Sessions with live model in Downtown Crested Butte. 349-7228.
• 6:30-7:45 p.m. Restorative Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 6:30-8 p.m. The Art of Fly Tying – Session 2 in the Gunnison Arts Center Adult Art Studio.
• 7 p.m. Alanon meeting at the Last Resort.
• 7-8:15 p.m. Yoga for Men at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7-8:30 p.m. Blessing Way Circle support group at Sopris Women’s Clinic. 720-217-3843.

WEDNESDAY 9
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7-8:15 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7:30 a.m. The Crested Butte / Mt. Crested Butte Rotary Club breakfast meeting in the Shavano Conference Room at the Elevation Hotel.
• 8:45 a.m. Mat Mix at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 9:30-10:45 a.m. Kaiut Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Two Buttes Senior Citizens van transportation. Roundtrip to Gunnison. Weather permitting. Call first for schedule and availability. 275-4768.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon – 1 p.m. Power Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 12:15-12:45 p.m. Yoga Nidra Relaxtion at Yoga for the Peaceful. ($5 donation)
• 3:30-5 p.m. ICELab tours at Western State College University with Patrick Rowley.
• 4 p.m. Growing Through Grief at GVH Home Medical Services, 120 N. Blvd., Gunnison. 970-641-4254. (Wednesdays thru May 23)
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5-10 p.m. Game night at Tassinong Farms, CB South.
• 5:15-6:15 p.m. Buti Yoga in the Gunnison Arts Center Dance Studio.
• 5:30 p.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30 p.m. Prenatal Yoga class in Crested Butte South. 349-1209.
• 5:45 p.m. Boot Camp and Indoor Biking at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Kundalini Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6:30 p.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back), 4th and Maroon. 349-6482.
• 7-9 p.m. “GriefShare,” a grief recovery seminar and support group, meets at Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, 711 N. Main St., Gunnison. 970-349-7769.

Events & Entertainment:

THURSDAY 3
• 5-7:30 p.m. Gunnison Valley Health hosts BikeLife, a free community bike party, at the north entrance of GVH. 642-8417.
• 6-8 p.m. Summer Gear Swap in the Multi-Purpose Room at CBCS.
• 7 p.m. Monthly Book Talk: The Dinner in the Gunnison Arts Center Board Room.
• 8 p.m. Ladies’ Night at the Red Room.

FRIDAY 4
• 3:30 p.m. CBCS girls varsity soccer game at Rainbow Park, JV game at 5:15.
• 5-8 p.m. First Friday ArtWalk & Music at the Gunnison Arts Center and the galleries of downtown Gunnison.
• 7 p.m. First Friday Family Film: Spaceballs at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 8 p.m. KBUT’s Off-Season Bingo at Tully’s in CB South. 349-5225.

SATURDAY 5
• 5:30 p.m. Cinco de Mayo Fiesta with Red Devil Squadron and Tequila El Espolon Models at the Talk of the Town.

SUNDAY 6
• 5-8 p.m. AFSP “Out of Darkness” Concert in the Gunnison Arts Center Black Box Theatre.

TUESDAY 8
• 5:30 p.m. Books-n-Bars at The Last Steep. 349-6535.

WEDNESDAY 9
Crested Butte Library closed for staff training from 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
• 7 p.m. Advanced Social Media Marketing with Deborah Tutnauer at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 8 p.m. Ladies’ Night at The Talk of the Town.

Kid’s Calendar:

THURSDAY 3
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class in the High Altitude Dance Academy in Gunnison.
• 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Art Babies & Toddler Art (ages 0-4) at The Trailhead. 349-7160.

FRIDAY 4
• 11 a.m. Big Kids Storytime (ages 3-7) at the Crested Butte Library.
• 4-5 p.m. Tang Soo Do Martial Arts classes for youth with West Elk Martial Arts, Town Hall Fitness Room. 901-7417.

MONDAY 7
• 3:45-5 p.m. Messy Mondays at the Crested Butte Library. (ages 5-12, kids 8 and under must be accompanied by an adult)
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.

WEDNESDAY 9
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music and Dance Class in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. 349-9639.
• 11 a.m. Baby & Toddler Literacy Time at the Crested Butte Library.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4:15-5:15 p.m. Kids Yoga (ages 8 and under) at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4:30-6:30 p.m. Mud Puppies—All the Things I Can Imagine (ages 5+) in the Gunnison Arts Center Clay Studio.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.

Community calendar Thursday, April 26–Wednesday, May 2

THURSDAY 26
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8 a.m. Ecumenical Meditation at UCC.
• 8-9:15 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8:30 a.m. Women’s book discussion group at UCC.
• 8:45 a.m. Indoor Biking at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9:30-10:45 a.m. Forrest Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 11 a.m. Weekly storytime at Townie Books. 349-7545.
• 11:30 a.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• noon All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Church Community Healing Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• noon-1 p.m. BUTI Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage, a free thrift store. 300 Belleview, Unit 2, on the south end of 3rd Street. 970-318-6826.
• 4:30-6 p.m. Crested Butte Community Food Bank open at Oh Be Joyful Church. (1st & 3rd Thursday)
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Vin-Yin Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Hatha Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 5:30-7:30 p.m. Cocktails & Canvases: Dragonfly Dreams at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 5:45 p.m. Zumba at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 5:45-7 p.m. Freestyle Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Kundalini Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6:30 p.m. AA Open Meditation at UCC.
• 7 p.m. Women Supporting Women Group Discussion at the Nordic Inn.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.

FRIDAY 27
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30 a.m. Barre Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8 a.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back). 349-6482.
• 8:45 a.m. Core Power Yoga Class at the Pump Room.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Yoga for the Flexibly Challenged / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Iyengar Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon-1:15 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon-1 p.m. Kundalini / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 1 p.m. Art group meets at the Senior Center. 641-4529.
• 4:30-5:30 p.m. Happy Hour Yoga at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30-7:30 p.m. Mud Wrestling at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 6-7 p.m. Poi Playshop at the Pump Room.

SATURDAY 28
• 7:30 a.m. Open AA at UCC.
• 7:45 a.m. Weights and Indoor Biking Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Community Yoga at the Sanctuary Yoga & Pilates Studio, Gunnison.
• 9-10 a.m. Mindful Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9:30-10:45 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 10-10:30 a.m. Questions & Freetime / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10-11 a.m. Hip Hop Community Dance Class at the Pump Room (above Fire House on 3rd & Maroon). 415-225-5300.
• 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Painting on Silk at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage, a free thrift store. 300 Belleview, Unit 2, on the south end of 3rd Street. 970-318-6826.
• noon-4 p.m. Paper Clay Workshop in the Gunnison Arts Center Clay Studio.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 6:30-7:30 p.m. Guided Sound Meditation at 405 4th Street.

SUNDAY 29
• 7-8 a.m. Meditation at Yoga for the Peaceful, by donation.
• 8:30 a.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 9 a.m. Worship Service at Union Congregational Church. 349-6405.
• 9 a.m. Worship Service at Oh Be Joyful Church.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 9:30-11 a.m. Free Community Class / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10-11:15 a.m. Vin-Yin at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Narcotics Anonymous Meeting at UCC, 403 Maroon Ave. Closed meeting for addicts only. (1st & 3rd Sundays)
• 4-5:15 p.m. CBCYC Community Book Club at 405 4th Street.
• 5-6 p.m. All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Eucharist at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• 5-7 p.m. Pick-up Adult Basketball. HS Gym, CBCS.
• 6 p.m. AA meets at UCC.
• 6 p.m. Evening Service at Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, 711 N. Main St., Gunnison.
• 6:30 p.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• 6:30-7:45 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7 p.m. Gamblers Anonymous meets at the Last Resort.

MONDAY 30
• 6-7:15 a.m. Sunrise Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7 a.m. Barre Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Pranayama and Namaskars / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Intro to Ashtanga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8:45 a.m. Pilates at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• noon Adult Children of Alcoholics open meeting at Union Congretional Church.
• 12:45 p.m. Bridge at the Senior Center. 641-4529.
• 2-3:15 p.m. Hatha Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4-5:30 p.m. Wisdom Women Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30-7 p.m. Moms in Motion class at the GVH rehab gym.
• 5:45 p.m. Boot Camp at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Yin Yoga Nidra at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6:30 p.m. WellBeing Connection Workshop at the CB/Mt. CB Chamber of Commerce.
• 6:30-8 p.m. Women’s Domestic Violence Support Group at Project Hope. Childcare available upon request. 641-2712.
• 7:30 p.m. Open AA at UCC. 349-5711.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.

TUESDAY 1
• 6-7 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful, by donation.
• 6:30-7:45 a.m. Intro to Ashtanga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30 a.m. AA/Alanon Open at UCC. 349-5711.
• 8-9:15 a.m. Intro to Ashtanga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Free Co-Working Tuesdays at the ICELab at WSCU.
• 8:45 a.m. Indoor Biking at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Mindful Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 11:30 a.m. League of Women Voters meeting at 210 W. Spencer in Gunnison.
• noon AA Closed at UCC.
• noon-1 p.m. Yoga for Flexibly Challenged / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunchtime Yoga with Leia in the Gunnison Arts Center Dance Studio.
• 1:30-3:30 p.m. Tech Tuesdays at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 2-3 p.m. Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage, a free thrift store. 300 Belleview, Unit 2, on the south end of 3rd Street. 970-318-6826.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:30-7:30 p.m. Stained Glass for Beginners (through Wednesday, May 2) at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 5:45 p.m. All Levels Yoga at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-7 p.m. Piyo at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6-8 p.m. Figure Drawing Sessions with live model in Downtown Crested Butte. 349-7228.
• 6:30-7:45 p.m. Restorative Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7 p.m. Alanon meeting at the Last Resort.
• 7-8:15 p.m. Yoga for Men at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7-8:30 p.m. Blessing Way Circle support group at Sopris Women’s Clinic. 720-217-3843.

WEDNESDAY 2
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7-8:15 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 7:30 a.m. The Crested Butte / Mt. Crested Butte Rotary Club breakfast meeting in the Shavano Conference Room at the Elevation Hotel.
• 8:45 a.m. Mat Mix at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 9:30-10:45 a.m. Kaiut Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Two Buttes Senior Citizens van transportation. Roundtrip to Gunnison. Weather permitting. Call first for schedule and availability. 275-4768.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon – 1 p.m. Power Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 12:15-12:45 p.m. Yoga Nidra Relaxtion at Yoga for the Peaceful. ($5 donation)
• 3:30-5 p.m. ICELab tours at Western State College University with Patrick Rowley.
• 4 p.m. Growing Through Grief at GVH Home Medical Services, 120 N. Blvd., Gunnison. 970-641-4254. (Wednesdays thru May 23)
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5-10 p.m. Game night at Tassinong Farms, CB South.
• 5:15-6:15 p.m. Buti Yoga in the Gunnison Arts Center Dance Studio.
• 5:30 p.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30 p.m. Prenatal Yoga class in Crested Butte South. 349-1209.
• 5:45 p.m. Boot Camp and Indoor Biking at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Kundalini Yoga at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful in CB South.
• 6:30 p.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back), 4th and Maroon. 349-6482.
• 7-9 p.m. “GriefShare,” a grief recovery seminar and support group, meets at Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, 711 N. Main St., Gunnison. 970-349-7769.

Events & Entertainment:

THURSDAY 26
• 6 p.m. Speed Date with a Book at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 8 p.m. Ladies’ Night at the Red Room.

SATURDAY 28
• 10:15 a.m. Yoga at the Library with guest instructor Dana Hersh. 349-6535.

SUNDAY 29
• 10 a.m. CB3P starts at CBMR base area.
• 3 p.m. Blue Line Duo performs a free percussion concert in the WSCU’s concert hall.

TUESDAY 1
• 9 a.m. Socrates Cafe: Would you want to be judged by your worst act? at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 7 p.m. Community Crafting Event at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.

WEDNESDAY 2
• 5:30-7:30 p.m. BikeLife kicks off with a free community ride at Hartman Rocks, organized by gO Orthopedics.
• 7 p.m. Social Media Basics with Holly Harmon at the Crested Butte Library. 349-6535.
• 8 p.m. Ladies’ Night at The Talk of the Town.

Kid’s Calendar:

THURSDAY 26
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class in the High Altitude Dance Academy in Gunnison.
• 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Art Babies & Toddler Art (ages 0-4) at The Trailhead. 349-7160.

FRIDAY 27
• 11 a.m. Big Kids Storytime (ages 3-7) at the Crested Butte Library.
• 4-5 p.m. Tang Soo Do Martial Arts classes for youth with West Elk Martial Arts, Town Hall Fitness Room. 901-7417.

MONDAY 30
• 3:45-5 p.m. Messy Mondays at the Crested Butte Library. (ages 5-12, kids 8 and under must be accompanied by an adult)
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.

WEDNESDAY 2
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music and Dance Class in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. 349-9639.
• 11 a.m. Baby & Toddler Literacy Time at the Crested Butte Library.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4:15-5:15 p.m. Kids Yoga (ages 8 and under) at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 4:30-6:30 p.m. Mud Puppies—All the Things I Can Imagine (ages 5+) in the Gunnison Arts Center Clay Studio.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.

Fifty Years of Flauschink: Who could have imagined? Part 3 of a three-part series

Crested Butte is about to enact its 50th Flauschink celebration. But what is it—just another excuse to get it on and party? If that’s all you want, then yes. But there’s always been more to it than just that. George Sibley, the last remaining founder of Flauschink, tells the story of why this celebration—along with a lot of other things—began back in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

by George Sibley

It’s not possible to describe the early origins of Crested Butte’s Flauschink celebration without looking at the larger American world the town was part of then, except when the town was feeling separate from that larger world.

America in the late 1960s was torn up and dragged down by a seemingly endless foreign war halfway around the world—a war that seemed increasingly unwinnable (and even unintelligible)—and by seemingly endless (and increasingly unintelligible) domestic wars over drugs and racism. Sound familiar?

But there was another big card in the game then, not present today: the draft card. The immediate threat of that, from the “Summer of Love” on, turned a lot of young Americans into refugees headed for Canada or remote places like Crested Butte on the outer edges of so-called civilization.

Crested Butte already had a history of refugees, people cast out of their ancestral lives by war, enclosure and other dislocations of the Industrial Revolution. The old-timers still here in the 1960s had little patience for the new refugees’ drugs of choice, uniforms and casual cohabitations, but many of the older ones had been through the labor wars, Prohibition, and other hot and cold running wars with the mainstream culture, and so had some empathy with the new refugees.

Crested Butte then also seemed to be “out of this world” economically. With nothing but a marginal hardrock mine on one mountain and a recently bankrupt ski resort on another, naifs like me could believe that the Industrial Revolution colonizing the rest of the world had left us behind. Wiser heads among us knew that the money would be back to mine whatever resources, even beauty, lay unexploited; but even they felt like we had an “open moment” in history—that we could imagine and even begin something different, which might give a different shape to the ultimate homogenizing formulas of 20th-century civilization. Most of us were broke, but felt unbroken; it was the “New World” again.

That sense of being a refugee colony, so far outside the war-making urban-industrial mainstream as to be free of it, unleashed a decade or so of “creative community” that is still very much part of what makes Crested Butte something other than just another mountain real estate development peddling amenities to the wealthy. With no external incentive, we put together our own “creative district” in 1968—the “Crested Butte Society,” intended (like the current Creative District) to “umbrella” new ideas for building a strong conscious community in some control of its future.

Within a decade, the public school area (with reconstruction under way on the old Rock School) had become a “summer convention center” with art classes recruited from as far away as the University of Kansas (1968) and the Chicago Art Institute (1969); we launched one of the state’s first arts festivals (1971), with a strong music component that set up the town’s Austin pipeline; we began the Mountain Theater (1972), with a spinoff in dance that led to Dance in the Mountains (1974) and eventually the School of Dance (late 1970s). The partially reconstructed Rock School became the first Town Museum (1976), progenitor of the Mountain Heritage Museum in Tony’s Hardware and Conoco building. We developed closer ties with the “bugologists” at RMBL in Gothic and Western State College; an emerging environmental awareness was formalized with the creation of the High Country Citizens Alliance (1977).

Not all of those “ongoing beginnings” were done under the Crested Butte Society umbrella, but they were all born of that same open moment before the 20th century began to again grind over the valley.

But first, before any of those things, was Flauschink in 1969. (You knew I’d get around to it eventually.) Before we could invent our own community, we had to find it; we had to learn—or maybe just remember from long ago—how to dance together and celebrate our lives together despite all the comings and goings and diverse backgrounds. And that’s what the late 1960s, from the so-called Summer of Love on, seemed to be about.

Life then—haunted as it was by the opportunities for misbegotten and meaningless death—had a strong Bacchic undercurrent, no less in Crested Butte than in the Fillmore West in San Francisco. Or maybe it wasn’t even just an undercurrent. That autumn in Crested Butte, when we sat down evenings around the round table at the Grubstake or at Frank’s Bar, the usually alienated Greek brothers both sat down with us—Apollo, god of reason and putting things together, and his half-brother Dionysus, god of wine and dance, getting it on and the next round. And if they started to glare at each other, Botsie Spritzer and his Stomach Steinway might get into some impromptu thing; there was a seamlessness those years to the dancing, drinking and thinking out loud together.

Often during the more sobered meetings the following mornings, we happened to remember duties laid out in what had been so blithely assigned the night before. (How will I ever pull together four pages of news every week?) Which led to the invention, a year or so later, on a quieter night but with the two brothers still contending for the soul of the place, of Flauschink.

And it continues, suggesting that we are probably, despite our better instincts, still honoring both brothers, the god of reason and the god of getting it on, in some kind of dynamic balance—not just in the spring but in the fall too, with Vinotok.

The Flauschink celebration owes a lot to many people who probably didn’t even realize they were part of an epic battle of old gods for the human soul, where we only lose if one trumps the other. Certainly Sherrie Vandervoort, who has shepherded the celebration since the late 1980s, first with her high-school friend Michele “Lipstick” English and Corky Lucks, now with Paula Dietrich replacing Lipstick.

And before that—Denis, Texas Jane, Marlene, Dana, Diner, LaDonna, Steve, Terry, and the rest of the hundred Has Beens. And the music: Native sons like the Mraule Brothers, Chris Rouse (returning this year), and the eternal King of Dance, Pete Dunda.

Would all the creative stuff have happened, the invention of Crested Butte as we know it now, if the entirely goofy Flauschink celebration of us just being who we are had not also happened? Everyone is entitled to his or her own opinion; I have mine. See you at the 50th celebration. Like Flauschink organizer and royal Has Been Sherrie Vandervoort says, “It’s just a great big celebration of life and the town we all adore.”

Best Flauschink Proclamation

Queen Susan Anderton, 1980:

“Less lifestyle; more life.”

Riding (or catching) the edge: Keep perspective at the end of a weird season

Riding down to Gunnison in the back of an ambulance Sunday afternoon, all I could think about was Brush Creek, the Epic Pass and last week’s Overheard getting pummeled on Facebook. Okay, not really. I was thinking about how not paying attention while skiing fast on a blue run and catching an edge was pretty dumb and probably pretty expensive. Let me say upfront: The whole experience with the people there to help was extraordinary. The response from the Crested Butte Professional Ski Patrol on the hill, the Crested Butte Fire Protection District’s EMT team at my house and on the ride down, the nurses and doctors at Gunnison Valley Hospital was professional and small-town comfortable. We are lucky to have them all. Thank you.

To make a long story short, Diane and I had skied up to watch the start of the AJ and I was heading back to the Queen when I caught that edge and all 198 pounds of me flew through the air before landing on flat “packed powder.” It hurt. But I’ve done it before and after a quick check from ski patrol I skied down. Recovering at home, things got a bit woozy and Diane called the EMTs. I was convinced to get checked out in Gunni and after a CT Scan, it was determined I would get to spend the night—which was better than the helicopter ride to GJ, which was on the table. Anyway, it was back to work Tuesday where the Crested Butte News crew had stepped up and I didn’t have to play much catch-up thanks to them. Thank you.

But back to work it is. So, with that experience, let me throw out there that at the end of a weird ski season people are riding the razor’s edge—and it is better not to catch the edge. Nothing is quite right with super-thin snowpack and rain in the forecast. It is easy to vent. How dare the ski area partner with Vail’s super pass and not get us free passes to the Back Bowls? How dare the News put something on the front page that might insult some people? How come the town said it was okay to fly a helicopter over Elk Avenue? Why haven’t we had one legit powder day when every time I hear the snow report Monarch is getting four times what we get? Why are Mt. Crested Butte and the Downtown Development Authority paying big bucks for an arts center parking lot when there is no longer even a plan for an arts center? Why is the town starting to smell like dog poop?

The end of any ski season always brings such questions from locals. Some are happy to see the end of the skiing and others want three more months of backcountry bliss. But in a low-snow year, everything is taken up a notch. The emotions are a bit more raw, the reactions to anything on the other side a bit more quick.

So as we wind up this strange season of a powder drought, it is time for the annual advice to take a breath and put it all in perspective. You get to live in (or visit) one of the special mountain valleys of Colorado. That in itself is pretty wonderful. Being up here at close to 9,000 feet where the air is thin, the sun and the stars shine bright, the sky is that much bluer and the people a tad more rugged than what you might find at the mall, is a gift.

There has always been a sometimes turbulent debate on how to guide this particular valley and that won’t go away. But instead of just immediately reacting to every little thing that provokes a tweak, take that extra second in the thin air to think about the big picture. Don’t just throw out negative word bombs about whatever is getting under your skin. That just adds to the dog poop smell in town. Include real perspective and useable solutions. Respect the other side that’s not part of your normal Facebook group. Be honest, forthright and respectful. And then let the chips fall.

Being part of the Epic Pass won’t turn this place into Vail. If they had bought the resort, it would be a different story but being a pass partner (and reading this week’s Notions, it probably wasn’t about us) should simply expand what we’ve seen on the weekends the last three seasons with the other super pass partnerships we’ve been a part of. Things in the paper are meant to inform, make people smile or make people think. We don’t aim to be politically correct. Last week’s Overheard—check. The heli over Elk Avenue last week could have been handled better in terms of notice but like so much of life, sometimes things come up unexpectedly and people have to deal and make decisions. The town administration did. In a stereotypical sense, Mt. Crested Butte decisions are typically based in growth so helping to facilitate the Nordic Inn to expand, and growing a new parking lot is not necessarily the right move given the amount of citizen feedback but it’s not that surprising. The lack of powder in Crested Butte might be a sign of things to come as the planet’s climate changes. Last year’s two-week epic powderness could actually be sending the same signal. Luckily we are up here pretty high in the Rocky Mountains so I imagine we have a few more seasons in us than other lower, resorts. That smell of dog poop in Crested Butte? That’s the annual smell of spring that normally pops out in April. Get used to it…unless Vail buys us and bans dogs that poop.

It is a weird perspective to face north while heading south in an ambulance. It is also beautiful. We are in a good place and while not without issues, trials and tribulations, we are pretty darn lucky. I know I am. I’m also sore. Enjoy the week of the spring equinox and embrace these days as they get longer up here at 9,000 feet. And above all else—don’t stop paying attention.

—Mark Reaman