Thursday, February 20, 2020

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Community calendar Thursday, August 11–Wednesday, August 17

THURSDAY 11
• 6:15-7:15 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7 a.m. Physical Therapy Fitness with Adventure Physical Therapy at CB South Sunset Hal. 970-251-5098.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Foundations for Alignment / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8 a.m. Ecumenical Meditation at UCC.
• 8 a.m. Motherhood Movement with Adventure Physical Therapy at CB South Sunset Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 8:30 a.m. Women’s book discussion group at UCC.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9 a.m. Historic Walking Tour of Crested Butte. Leaves from the Crested Butte Heritage Museum. 349-1880.
• 9-10 a.m. Yoga for Everyone with Yoga for the Peaceful on the Center’s Outdoor Stage. 349-7487.
• 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Summer Science Tour: The Secret Lives of Butterflies with Rachel Steward of the University of South Carolina at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory Visitor Center. 349-7156.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Gunnison County Branch Office is open at the Crested Butte Town Offices.
• 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Weekly Sketching Series with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 10 a.m. Mothering Support Group at Oh Be Joyful Church. (Last Thursday of every month)
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 11:30 p.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• noon All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Church Community Healing Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• noon-1 p.m. Shoulders, Knees and Feet Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 12:30-1:30 p.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage. 300 Belleview, Unit 2. Free clothing and bedding. 970-318-6826.
• 4:30-6 p.m. Crested Butte Community Food Bank open at Oh Be Joyful Church. (First Thursday of every month)
• 5:30 p.m. Communion service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:45 p.m. World Dance Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-8 p.m. Pick-up Adult Soccer at Town Park.
• 6:30 p.m. AA Open Meditation at UCC.
• 7 p.m. Women Supporting Women Group Discussion at the Nordic Inn.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.

FRIDAY 12
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7 a.m. Barre Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7-8:30 a.m. Mysore Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8-9 a.m. Aerial Conditioning with the Crested Butte Dance Collective at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 8:30 a.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back). 349-6482.
• 8:45 a.m. Core Power Yoga Class at the Pump Room.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Yoga for the Flexibly Challenged / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9 a.m.-noon Open Wheel Throwing at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunch Break Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• noon-1:15 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 5-7 p.m. Crested Butte Tennis Club Social Mixer at the Town Tennis Courts. (weather permitting)
• 5:30 p.m. Communion service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30-7:30 p.m. Acro Yoga with Jes Park at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 6-7 p.m. Poi Playshop at the Pump Room.
• 7-9 p.m. Pick-up adult Karate, Fitness Room at Town Hall.

SATURDAY 13
• 7:30 a.m. Open AA at UCC.
• 8 a.m. Weights/Indoor Biking Circuit Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Vinyasa Flow with Inversions / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Community Yoga at the Sanctuary Yoga & Pilates Studio, Gunnison.
• 9-11 a.m. Restorative Yoga Workshop with Jen Laggis at the Gym.
• 10-11 a.m. Hip Hop Community Dance Class at the Pump Room (above Fire House on 3rd & Maroon). 415-225-5300.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 10:30 a.m.-noon St. Mary’s Garage. 300 Belleview, Unit 2. Free clothing and bedding. 970-318-6826.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 1-3 p.m. Summer Knitting classes at Kasala Gallery. 970-251-5055.
• 4-5:30 p.m. Free Yoga Basics with Theresa Schaul at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 6:30-7:30 p.m. Guided Sound Meditiation at 405 4th Street.

SUNDAY 14
• 7-8 a.m. Meditation at Yoga For The Peaceful, by donation.
• 8:30 a.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 8:30 a.m. Worship Service at Oh-Be-Joyful Church.
• 9 a.m. Worship Service at Union Congretional Church. 349-6405.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9:30-11 a.m. Community Free Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10 a.m. Worship Service at Oh-Be-Joyful Church.
• 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Crested Butte Farmer’s Market and Art Market on Elk Avenue.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 3-5 p.m. Intro to Kaiut Yoga with Ashley Sargent at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 4-5 p.m. West African Drum Class with Laine Ludwig at the Pump Room. 970-275-0067.
• 4-5:15 p.m. CBCYC Community Book Club at 405 4th Street.
• 5-6 p.m. All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Eucharist at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• 5-7 p.m. Pick-up Adult Basketball. HS Gym, CBCS.
• 5:15-6:45 p.m. West African Dance Class with Rujeko Dumbutshena (former Broadway star and acclaimed artist and choreographer) from Zimbabwe with live drums at the Pump Room. 970-596-8385.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 6 p.m. AA meets at UCC.
• 6-8 p.m. Pick-up Adult Soccer at Town Park.
• 6:30 p.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• 7 p.m. Gamblers Anonymous meets at the Last Resort.

MONDAY 15
• 7 a.m. Cardio Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Community Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Pranayama & Namaskar / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45 a.m. Pilates at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For the Peaceful.
• 9-11 a.m. Summer Knitting classes at Kasala Gallery. 970-251-5055.
• 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Plein Air Watercolor Workshop Series with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• noon-1 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunch Break Vinyasa Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 1-4:30 p.m. Glass Sampler Workshops: Glass Painting at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 2:30 p.m. Balance, Foot, and Core Strength with Adventure Physical Therapy in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 3:30 p.m. Motherhood Movement with Adventure Physical Therapy in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5 p.m. Mothering Support Group at the GVH Education House, 300 East Denver St. (First Monday of every month)
• 5:30 p.m. Communion service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Yin Yoga Nidra at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:30-7 p.m. Moms in Motion class at the GVH rehab gym.
• 6:30-8 p.m. Women’s Domestic Violence Support Group at Project Hope. Childcare available upon request. 641-2712.
• 7:30 p.m. Open AA at UCC. 349-5711.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.

TUESDAY 16
• 6-7 a.m. Meditation at Yoga For The Peaceful, by donation.
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7 a.m. Physical Therapy Fitness with Adventure Physical Therapy at CB South Sunset Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 7-8 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 7:30 a.m. AA/Alanon Open at UCC. 349-5711.
• 8 a.m. Motherhood Movement with Adventure Physical Therapy at CB South Sunset Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 9 a.m. Historic Walking Tour of Crested Butte. Leaves from the Crested Butte Heritage Museum. 349-1880.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Gunnison County branch office is open at the Crested Butte Town Offices, 507 Maroon Ave.
• 10-11 a.m. Power Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 11:30 a.m. League of Women Voters meeting at 210 W. Spencer in Gunnison.
• noon AA Closed at UCC.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunch Break Athletic Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 12:30-1:30 p.m. Therapeutic Yoga at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 1:30-3:30 p.m. Tech Tuesdays at Old Rock Library. 349-6535.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage. 300 Belleview, Unit 2. Free clothing & bedding.
970-318-6826.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion Service at Queen of All Saints Church.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:30-8:30 p.m. Metalworking – Sterling Silver Pendant at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 5:45 p.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-8 p.m. Figure Drawing Sessions with a live model in Downtown Crested Butte. 349-7228.
• 6-8 p.m. Pick-up Adult Soccer at Town Park.
• 6:30 p.m. Crested Butte Library Poetry Collective meets at the Old Rock Library. (every 2nd Tuesday of the month)
• 6:30-7:45 p.m. Gentle Restorative Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7 p.m. Alanon meeting at the Last Resort.
• 7-8 p.m. Movement & Meditation at Yoga For The Peaceful. 349-0302.
• 7-8 p.m. Aerial Conditioning with the Crested Butte Dance Collective at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 7-8:30 p.m. Blessing Way Circle support group at Sopris Women’s Clinic. 720-217-3843.
• 7:45-9:45 p.m. Drop-in Adult Volleyball, CBCS MS Gym.

WEDNESDAY 17
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30 a.m. The Crested Butte / Mt. Crested Butte Rotary Club breakfast meeting in the Shavano Conference Room at the Elevation Hotel.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 8:30 a.m. Hike with HCCA. Sign up at hccacb.org.
• 8:45 a.m. Mat Mix at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Inversions and Backbends / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Two Buttes Senior Citizens van transportation. Roundtrip to Gunnison. Weather permitting. Call first for schedule and availability. 275-4768.
• 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Middle School Art Sessions: Silk Painting Jewelry (through Thursday, August 18) at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunch Break Blend Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• noon-1 p.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 2:30 p.m. Easy Stretch & Relax with Adventure Physical Therapy in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 3:30 p.m. Motherhood Movement with Adventure Physical Therapy in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5 p.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30 p.m. Prenatal Yoga class in Crested Butte South. 349-1209.
• 5:45 p.m. Boot Camp Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Give Back Yoga at Yoga For The Peaceful benefitting Gunnison County Substance Abuse Prevention Project (GCSAPP).
• 6:30-8 p.m. Restorative Yin-Yoga-Nidra / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7-9 p.m. “GriefShare,” a grief recovery seminar and support group, meets at Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, 711 N. Main St., Gunnison. 970-349-7769.
• 7:30 p.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back). 349-6482.

Kid’s Calendar

THURSDAY 11
• 9 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class in the High Attitude Dance Academy in Gunnison. (runs through August 18)
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 3-8 p.m. Youth Gymnastics, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall 349-5338.

FRIDAY 12
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 11 a.m. Big Kids Storytime for ages 3-7 at Old Rock Library.
• 4-5 p.m. Tang Soo Do Martial Arts classes for youth with West Elk Martial Arts, Town Hall Fitness Room. 901-7417.

MONDAY 15
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Advanced Art for ages 9-11 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 2-3:30 p.m. Fairy Bliss Kids’ Yoga Festival, ages 3-7 at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.

TUESDAY 16
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Advanced art for ages 9-11 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. (runs through August 16)
• 11 a.m. Romp & Rhyme Storytime for families and kids of all ages at Old Rock Library.
• 2-3:30 p.m. Fairy Bliss Kids’ Yoga Festival, ages 8-12 at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 3-8 p.m. Youth Gymnastics, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall 349-5338.

WEDNESDAY 17
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. (runs through August 17)
• 11 a.m. Babies and Toddlers Storytime at Old Rock Library.
• 3:45-4:45 p.m. Tween Scene (ages 8-12) at the Old Rock Library.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.

Events & Entertainment

THURSDAY 11
• 5:30-7:30 p.m. Ladies Bike Tech with Backcountry Bike Academy at the Old Rock Library.
• 7 p.m. Evelyn Roper plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7-8 p.m. Art chat with Rosalind Cook about sculptor Rodin at the River Light Art Gallery.
• 8 p.m. Ladies Night at the Red Room.
• 10 p.m. Karaoke upstairs in the Sky Bar at the Talk of the Town.

FRIDAY 12
• 5-8 p.m. Suzanne Pierson & Laura Cooper Elm Artist Reception at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 5-8 p.m. Artists’ Reception, Summer Selections at Oh Be Joyful Gallery.
• 7 p.m. Dawne Belloise & Chuck Grossman play at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7 p.m. Dance for Life & Coram Deo “In the Presence of God” in the Taylor Auditorium at WSCU.
• 8 p.m. Karaoke with DJ Triple L at the Red Room.
• 8 p.m. Appleseed Collective at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 10 p.m.Great Blue plays at the Eldo.

SATURDAY 13
• 8 a.m. 15th annual Crested Butte Ball Bash at all three softball fields in town.
• 9 a.m. Rinehart 100 West Elk Classic at CBMR, registration 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
• 5:30 p.m. Crested Butte Ball Bash Home Run Derby game at Tommy V.
• 7 p.m. Meet the PeaceDoer, Liska Blodgett, speaking on ‘Why we need Peace Heroes, locally and globally’ at Rumors.
• 7 p.m. Craig McLaughlin plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 10 p.m. Cycles play at the Eldo.

SUNDAY 14
• 8 a.m.15th annual Crested Butte Ball Bash at Tommy V and Gothic Fields.
• 11 a.m.-3 p.m. CBCS Volleyball Team is hosting a car wash to raise money in the Community Banks parking lot
• noon Rinehart 100 West Elk Classic at CBMR, registration 7:30-10:30 a.m.
• 2-6 p.m. Happy Hour with Chuck Grossman at the Eldo.
• 4 p.m. Crested Butte Ball Bash Championship game at Tommy V Field.
• 4 p.m. Chefs on the Edge at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 4 p.m. Dough Scharnberg plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 4-7 p.m. Gunnison County Democrats annual picnic at Gunnison Mountain Park located east of Almont.
• 6 p.m. Rachel VanSlyke plays at Montanya’s.
• 7 p.m.Tyler Lucas & Casey Mae play at the Princess Wine Bar.

MONDAY 15
• 5:30 p.m. Alpenglow: Mama Magnolia at the Center for the Arts Outdoor Stage.
• 7 p.m.The Icy Mitts play at the Princess Wine Bar.

TUESDAY 16
• 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Wildflower & Science Extravaganza: Gothic-Gunsight-Kochevar! with 1% for Open Space and the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory.
• 4-6 p.m. Canvases & Cocktails at Bonez with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 5:30 p.m. CB Devo presents Giddyup Film Tour and Silent Auction at the Majestic Theatre. Doors open at 5 p.m.
• 6 p.m. Tour de Forks – City Sensibility with the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 6:30 p.m. Caribou Mountain Collective plays Burgers & Brews at the I Bar Ranch.
• 7 p.m. Mindfulness Part 2 with presenter Mary Burt at the Old Rock Library.
• 7 p.m. Chuck Grossman plays at the Princess Wine Bar.

WEDNESDAY 17
• 4 p.m. gOgirl Ride, meet at Griggs Ortho Clinic in Crested Butte.
• 5:30 p.m. The Record Company plays Live! From Mt. Crested Butte at the Red Lady Stage at CBMR.
• 6-8 p.m. Nathan Bilow & Denise Hawk Artist Reception at the Piper Gallery of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 7 p.m. Evelyn Roper plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7:30 p.m. Pool tournament upstairs at the Talk of the Town.

Profile: Amy Degraff Zay

During the busiest time of the year, Amy DeGraff Zay darts out of the kitchen like a racehorse out of the start gate, expertly balancing four plates of sumptuously prepared dishes at Ryce’s Asian Restaurant. She smiles broadly at her customers, who are also smiling with eyes fixated on their dinner, and for the most part, oblivious to her question, “Can I get you anything else?”

She scurries off to her next table of starving tourists or locals. Amy has learned to juggle a multitude of jobs, live on the road at an early age, and develop talents when she had to, all of which honed her for living in this valley. Her path hasn’t always been easy.

profile-amy
Photo by Lydia Stern

Her mother was only in her late teens when Amy came into the world. A few months later, Amy’s father was killed in combat in Vietnam. Her mother moved around quite a bit after that, working as an operating room technician. Amy submersed herself in books, admitting that her fervor as a quiet child and complete nerd was reading a lot of Sherlock Holmes and anything   British or mysterious.

At the age of six, Amy’s father’s parents took the youngster on tour with them—Amy’s famous grandfather was country pop star Rusty Draper. “I’d get out of school in June and I’d go to my grandparents’ house in Seattle,” she smiles, recalling the ritual of preparing for the summer-long tour. “We’d clean out Nordstrom’s. We’d have to stock up on our summer wardrobes because we were in the public a lot so we had to look good. And then we would pack up and hit the road. It was a Patsy Cline style tour where Nanna Fay drove the big Buick wagon and Grandpa Rusty drove the Caddy.”

The first stop of the tour was at a resort in Jackson Hole, where the Rusty Draper Band would play two shows a night, six nights a week for six weeks. “We never got home till 3 a.m.,” Amy said of the musician’s life of late nights. “When we first arrived, we’d roll in and go right to the bar inside the Wort Hotel and set up with the rest of the band. He played the room next to the Silver Dollar Bar. It smelled like cigarettes and stale beer and I loved it! I don’t drink beer to this day,” Amy laughs. There were additional tour dates to Reno and other resort towns that involved more smoky bars.

Her grandmother ran a tight ship when it came to the professionalism of the band, whose members were all required to be sober or else. “My grandmother would freak out,” Amy says. Back in those days of the 1970s, Jackson Hole was not much of a resort, according to Amy, but her grandfather’s band drew a crowd and they had their groupies, who were wealthy couples that would follow the band around. “I attended all the shows and kept seeing these same people,” Amy says.

While they were living at the resort for the duration of their musical stint, Amy tells that they’d get up in the morning, go into town, and do the shopping. “Everything from toilet paper to fur coats, whatever my grandmother wanted to buy. My grandfather would be playing golf while we shopped. We’d always have dinner together because there was a family value and work ethic. I don’t know if that’s present in entertainment families today.”

After dinner the family would head out to work, off to play the shows. While her grandfather was onstage, Amy would get sent to sit in the back of the bar and, as she recalls, “Drink multiple Shirley Temples and sell eight-track tapes between shows while grandpa autographed them. I can remember when cassettes came out because it was a big deal. If I hadn’t fallen asleep, I’d sell tapes after the shows too, but,” she remembers fondly, “I was carried to the car by my grandfather many times and we’d drive home up to Teton Village where we stayed.”

Being the granddaughter of a famous recording artist, and being able to be a part of the tour, Amy would feel so much pride when her grandfather sang a song from the stage just for her. “He’d sing me the classic, ‘Once in Love with Amy.’ Grandpa was not a songwriter, he was a musician and entertainer, playing an old Gretsch guitar.” Amy beams as she shares her road stories and the history of grandpa Rusty Draper, who had multiple recordings that sold more than a million copies in the 1950s and ‘60s. When he was younger, he had worked at a radio station in Des Moines, Iowa, where he often filled in for Ronald Reagan, who was then a sportscaster. He later had his own radio shows in San Francisco and Los Angeles, Calif. and was often on television, including two appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show, and he even hosted his own TV show for a season on NBC.

“Willie Nelson wrote ‘Nightlife’ for my grandfather to record and they co-owned the Pink Garter Saloon together in the 1950s, back when Willie had a crewcut,” Amy says of some of Draper’s more memorable accomplishments. But more than his fame, Amy remembers her grandfather for his kindness, guidance and the love her grandparents showed her, shaping her life with positivity in what she feels were the most formative and best years

“My grandparents’ home was my haven,” she says. So when her mother decided to move to Texas as Amy was heading into eighth grade, it didn’t sit well. “I’m still recovering from high school.” She grimaces about the move to the Dallas area in 1982. When her mom remarried, her step dad, who worked for telephone company GTE, was transferred to Dallas. “I got thrown into this very wealthy area,” which was alien to her coming from an average middle-class neighborhood in Seattle. “I was 14 and it was a difficult adjustment.” Amy was in culture shock.

“I didn’t understand who Ralph Lauren or Calvin Klein were, and at the time they were new and expensive. So I wasn’t popular. I had no connection there with anyone.” She graduated in 1986 and enrolled at North Texas State University in Denton (now the University of North Texas) taking a business curriculum.

“I had a really good time, but I was not really focused on classes, so I immediately started a family with a man I had known in Denton.” They married in 1990 and the couple had two daughters, Victoria, born in 1991, and Priscilla in ‘95.

For employment, Amy took over her family’s successful dog boarding kennel in Denton after her mother moved to Gunnison in 1996, and a couple of years later Amy sold that business. She then went to work for the Denton Chamber of Commerce, running all their programs and business events. “It was a great job and I still miss it. It was during a growth time, which made it a lot of fun, connecting with all the business owners.” Probably needing more caffeine from an exceptionally busy work life and raising her girls, Amy decided to start up her own drive-through espresso shop, which became instantly popular.

When Amy divorced in the late 1990s, she felt as though she had lost her focus, and moving closer to her mother in Gunnison in 2001, Amy landed a sales job at the Gunnison Country Times. She later went to work in sales for The Yellow Book. In between the various types of employment, Amy picked up seasonal winter work as a counter agent with United Airlines. Her third daughter, Jillian, was born in Gunnison in 2003 during a brief marriage.

Amy excelled in customer relation skills, and Yellow Book wanted to keep her as a saleswoman, moving her to Portland, Oregon, in 2006. “Portland was a great area but didn’t speak to me, and I moved back to Gunnison in 2010,” she tells, and adds that she started working as a server at Ryce.

Amy remembers what it was like to be pulled out of her element and tossed into another universe at the critical age of 14 and wanted to make sure her daughter gets to stay in Gunnison. “Jillian is going into eighth grade, and being 14 is more crucial than people realize. You need things consistent, you don’t want to make big changes in their lives.” Although Amy doesn’t ski because she swears she’d just get cold and fall over, she makes sure her daughter gets to ski.

Amy muses that through all her musical exposure, she has no natural musical skill herself. “But I was taught to appreciate all kinds of music and we weren’t allowed to criticize anyone’s music. I don’t particularly have an ear but I know talent when I see it. Personally and absolutely music is a big part of my life today, as an observer. For me, live music literally gives me a high without any added substances.”

Amy’s experience from “Being in the inner workings of shows through my grandparents and listening to my grandfather’s recordings in the studio with him over and over, just to make sure it’s right,” gives her an in depth perspective of both the industry and the music itself. “When the instruments come together, there’s a magic and I’m always just blown away,” she laughs again and shakes her head, admitting, “but I haven’t found my groove yet.”

 

Profile: DJ Brown

In the far southwest corner of the panhandle of Oklahoma, just before you cross into New Mexico, is the very tiny town of Felt. “And that’s where I grew up,” beams DJ Brown, “on a farm that wasn’t big enough to be a ranch but we had everything from cattle to chickens and horses to pigs and we grew veggies,” for her family’s self-sufficient lifestyle. As a typically close extended family, DJ was raised between her grandparents and parents, all of them living on the same farm.

She spent most of her childhood days with her grandmother, doing the endless chores required and learning ways that are barely practiced in modern America today, like canning and baking from scratch.

“A lot of what I do, a lot of my recipes, are from my grandmother,” DJ says proudly. Living on a farm meant everyone had to help with everything. They grew wheat, corn, and milo (a grassy wheat grain) to sell, and when harvest time came around, DJ and her brother worked in the fields, driving the farm equipment.

During harvest, her whole family, including aunts and uncles, would come together to spend days and days working. “Everyone would camp out on the farm, harvesting everything in my grandmother’s garden. It was enough food to feed all five families. They’re some of my best memories. I had a million cousins and we all chipped in, some of us would be in the garage shucking corn, others would be in the backyard snapping beans. That’s how I grew up,” DJ remembers fondly.

photo by Lydia Stern
photo by Lydia Stern

When DJ went into high school, farming had become less lucrative financially so her parents decided to pursue careers and her farm family diversified. “Dad became a respiratory therapist and mom became a nurse assistant. My first job outside of the farm was a certified nurse assistant while I was still in high school.” DJ explains that in a small town, you could do or be anything. “Kind of like here in Crested Butte, where everyone does a million different things to make ends meet.”

DJ’s high school graduation class in 1995 consisted of seven students, and the year before there weren’t any graduates at all. She was anxious to get out of small-town life and into a city, any city where half the population wasn’t related to each other or grew up solely within their small population.

“I thought I knew what I wanted to do out of high school, so I enrolled at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater.” She had plans to earn her bachelor of science degree in nursing—DJ considered this the easy path since it was what she had been doing, so it felt like a natural progression. However, it didn’t take long before she realized that the nursing path was no longer engaging or challenging to her.

DJ turned to art. “I had always liked art, dabbling in sketching and drawing. My grandmother painted all the time, in oils and on every medium… wood, canvas, paper or anything that she had at her disposal. I feel like I was exposed to art through her. Mom had done a lot of craftwork so I always loved that stuff while I was growing up. I never had the option of taking art in my small school because they didn’t offer it.”

It was a pretty big jump for her when she changed her degree to arts and majored in graphic design in her sophomore year. Although she lost about a year having a different core focus in science and math, she was thrilled after taking her first official art class in college and she realized that it actually helped solidify some of her thought processes. “I’m a big non-conformer, not coloring between the lines, so it was somewhat of a relief to be in that environment on the opposite spectrum of sciences.”

DJ graduated in 2000 with a degree in graphic design and a minor in computer science (a.k.a., MSCS), the latter supplementing her major because she didn’t want to be a starving artist. During college she had worked for Creative Labs in Stillwater as a tech support and it was there that she met her future hubby, Brian Brown. The couple married in 1999 and now have a daughter, Mattie, who is 14 and a son, Connor, who is 10.

After DJ graduated from college in 2000, they moved to Tulsa where she secured a job as a forms designer, creating medical forms, and eventually moved into the supervisor job and then into an IT position. A decade later, in 2010, she left that job for a position in IT at a financial institution.

DJ’s husband, Brian, throughout his childhood was skiing Monarch from Oklahoma and during summers his family would head to Estes Park, so he was already enamored of Colorado. DJ had skied Angel Fire, Red River and Taos in her youth, but never Colorado until after the two married.

They hit the CBMR slopes for the first time in 2000, and DJ excitedly recalls, “I loved it, from the tourist perspective. I loved the terrain and the mountain itself,” and she noted that the other resorts they had been skiing were not what they were looking for. “The feel we got from Crested Butte, just from skiing, was a community feel.”

At that point in her life she was coming around full circle. “We were thinking of starting a family, and a small community atmosphere was enticing to me,” she says of the familiarity of growing up in her own tiny town. Like many who succumb to the Crested Butte magic, they started talking about how they could make their lives work from this somewhat remote town and they started thinking about how to move here. They had never seen a Crested Butte summer but after taking multiple ski vacations here, the growing family bought a house at Meridian Lake up Washington Gulch in February of 2012 and started seriously dreaming about a mountain life for their kids and themselves. By the end of that May, they decided to move up full-time.

DJ could work from home as her employer was a very forward-thinking company as far as resources go. Brian was and still is a computer consultant, running his own company, Slopeside Technologies, after their move to Crested Butte. They came up in July for two weeks to initiate the move, with the wildflowers exploding around them.

DJ smiles broadly and remembers, “Oh my God, it was amazing. I had no idea before that summer. We had always heard people talk about how beautiful it was with all the flowers. It was eye opening and reaffirming that this is really where we were supposed to be. When we left Tulsa it was 115 degrees so to be someplace where we could go out and hike or bike during the day was tremendous. It was good for our kids because the environment here is so much better.

“I felt like everything that I tried to get away from when I was growing up is everything I was trying to get back to. It’s very comparative here to the lifestyle I grew up with, everybody in the community knows everybody. It’s not everyday normal here. That’s what we were looking for, for our kids, having freedoms, being able to ride a bus by themselves, being able to play in the yard without fear. And on top of that you have all of nature around you, all of those outdoor activities that we like to do. It’s a complete package.”

So let’s cut to the cake… DJ tells, “As I was growing up, my mother dabbled in cake decorating before I was born, doing a lot of work for weddings, birthdays and events. As a kid, I never ate a store-bought cake. After my daughter was born in Tulsa, I started doing some cake decorating for fun, just for family and friends. In Oklahoma I either had to rent space or work under another baker, so I didn’t do a lot commercial baking since I didn’t have my own commercial kitchen at that time.

“After we moved here, in the fall I started trying to bake and discovered that I just could not bake,” DJ says of the challenge of altitude baking. “I tried baking the same cake three times and each time it was awful. I thought I’d never bake a cake again,” she laughs, remembering the frustration.

She read online recipes and sought out various instructions trying to figure out the difference. It took her about 10 months before she finally converted all her recipes and the trial and error stage stopped being painful. “A lot of flour and sugar went into the trash,” she grimaced.

With Colorado’s Cottage Foods Act, which states you can operate as a home baker and sell to end consumers, DJ felt it was time to open up her side job business, mostly for fun. She calls her baked creations “A Taste of Cake.”

“Gum paste and fondant work are my specialties,” she says of the art that’s also called sugar work. “I do blown sugar work as well, where you heat up a special kind of sugar and you can make displays, it’s like glass blowing with sugar.”

The only formal training DJ had in cake making was several courses under Nicholas Lodge, who is a world-renowned sugar artist. His background is in botany and his whole intent was to become well versed in that science to rebuild the florals in sugar.

DJ is adept in both blown and handcrafted flowers as well as other decorative cake art. Her cakes depict colorful and even translucent scenes, as though the fairies of confection conjured up fantasy pictograms of underwater scenes, forest animals, flowers and delicate foliage.

As word got around about her tasty creations, DJ started making cakes for birthdays, anniversaries, and novelty events. Clients will email a photo or picture to her and DJ takes joy in figuring out how to create it. “That’s fulfilling for me, the sculpting, the flowers—that’s my favorite part.”

“I’d love to do it as my sole job, however I found that for me, I have to have a balance of my analytical side and the artistic cake side, which is more fun, more of an outlet, and when I get really busy with cake orders, it almost becomes work then. It’s still fun, but not as fun, and it becomes stressful at that point. Eventually, I’ll retire from my day job but I don’t know that I would ever make the cake business something that I use to solely financially support me.”

And the odd part is, she laughs, “I don’t like to eat cake,” and that can be difficult in the cake biz, especially if the baker is at the event they’ve provided the cake for. “I might eat a couple of bites because it’s difficult to explain to people why I won’t eat my own cake… but I don’t eat any cake. Now pie is a whole different ballgame,” she admits with a grin. “I love pie. My family loves cake and they get a ton of it because there are always scraps, so there’s always cake at my house.”

Community calendar Thursday, July 28–Wednesday, August 3

THURSDAY 28
• 6:15-7:15 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7 a.m. Physical Therapy Fitness with Adventure Physical Therapy at CB South Sunset Hal. 970-251-5098.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Foundations for Alignment / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8 a.m. Ecumenical Meditation at UCC.
• 8 a.m. Motherhood Movement with Adventure Physical Therapy at CB South Sunset Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Take a Hike! Int / Adv Wine Hike & Picnic Lunch with the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival. 349-7487.
• 8:30 a.m. Women’s book discussion group at UCC.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9 a.m. Historic Walking Tour of Crested Butte. Leaves from the Crested Butte Heritage Museum. 349-1880.
• 9-10 a.m. Yoga for Everyone with Yoga For The Peaceful at the Center for the Arts Outdoor Stage. 349-7487.
• 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Summer Science Tour: Nature vs. Nuture and the Role of Genetic Variation with Dr. Tom Mitchell-Olds and Lauren Carley at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory Visitor Center. 349-7156.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Gunnison County Branch Office is open at the Crested Butte Town Offices.
• 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Weekly Sketching Series with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 10 a.m. Mothering Support Group at Oh Be Joyful Church. (Last Thursday of every month)
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 11:30 p.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• noon All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Church Community Healing Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• noon-1 p.m. Shoulders, Knees and Feet Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 12:30-1:30 p.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage. 300 Belleview, Unit 2. Free clothing and bedding. 970-318-6826.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:45 p.m. World Dance Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-8 p.m. Pick-up Adult Soccer at Town Park.
• 6:30 p.m. AA Open Meditation at UCC.
• 7 p.m. Women Supporting Women Group Discussion at the Nordic Inn.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.

FRIDAY 29
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7-8:30 a.m. Mysore Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7:30 a.m. Barre Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:30 a.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back). 349-6482.
• 8:45 a.m. Core Power Yoga Class at the Pump Room.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Yoga for the Flexibly Challenged / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9 a.m.-noon Open Wheel Throwing at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunch Break Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• noon-1:15 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 12:30-2 p.m. The Oaking of Wine with the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival. 349-7487.
• 5-7 p.m. Crested Butte Tennis Club Social Mixer at the Town Tennis Courts. (weather permitting)
• 5:30 p.m. Communion service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 6-7 p.m. Poi Playshop at the Pump Room.
• 7-9 p.m. Pick-up adult Karate, Fitness Room at Town Hall.

SATURDAY 30
• 7:30 a.m. Open AA at UCC.
• 8 a.m. 30/30 Indoor Cycling Weight Circuit Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Vinyasa Flow with Inversions / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Community Yoga at the Sanctuary Yoga & Pilates Studio, Gunnison.
• 10-11 a.m. Hip Hop Community Dance Class at the Pump Room (above Fire House on 3rd & Maroon). 415-225-5300.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 10:30 a.m.-noon St. Mary’s Garage. 300 Belleview, Unit 2. Free clothing and bedding. 970-318-6826.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 1-3 p.m. Summer Knitting classes at Kasala Gallery. 970-251-5055.
• 6:30-7:30 p.m. Guided Sound Meditiation at 405 4th Street.

SUNDAY 31
• 7-8 a.m. Meditation at Yoga For The Peaceful, by donation.
• 8:30 a.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 8:30 a.m. Worship Service at Oh-Be-Joyful Church.
• 9 a.m. Worship Service at Union Congretional Church. 349-6405.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9:30-11 a.m. Community Free Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10 a.m.-noon Mandalas for Mindfulness at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 10 a.m. Worship Service at Oh-Be-Joyful Church.
• 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Crested Butte Farmer’s Market and Art Market on Elk Avenue.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 1-2 p.m. Zumba class with Barron Farnell at the Pump Room.
• 4-5 p.m. West African Drum Class with Laine Ludwig at the Pump Room. 970-275-0067.
• 4-5:15 p.m. CBCYC Community Book Club at 405 4th Street.
• 5-6 p.m. All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Eucharist at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• 5-7 p.m. Pick-up Adult Basketball. HS Gym, CBCS.
• 5:15-6:45 p.m. West African Dance Class with Angela Carroll at the Pump Room. 970-596-8385.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 6 p.m. AA meets at UCC.
• 6-8 p.m. Pick-up Adult Soccer at Town Park.
• 6:30 p.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• 7 p.m. Gamblers Anonymous meets at the Last Resort.

MONDAY 1
• 7 a.m. Cardio Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Community Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Pranayama & Namaskar / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45 a.m. Mat Mix at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For the Peaceful.
• 9-11 a.m. Summer Knitting classes at Kasala Gallery. 970-251-5055.
• 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Plein Air Watercolor Workshop Series with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• noon-1 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunch Break Vinyasa Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 1-4:30 p.m. Glass Sampler Workshops: Etching on Glass at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 2:30 p.m. Balance, Foot, and Core Strength with Adventure Physical Therapy in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 3:30 p.m. Motherhood Movement with Adventure Physical Therapy in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Yin Yoga Nidra at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:30-7 p.m. Moms in Motion class at the GVH rehab gym.
• 6:30-8 p.m. Women’s Domestic Violence Support Group at Project Hope. Childcare available upon request. 641-2712.
• 7:30 p.m. Open AA at UCC. 349-5711.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.

TUESDAY 2
• 6-7 a.m. Meditation at Yoga For The Peaceful, by donation.
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7 a.m. Physical Therapy Fitness with Adventure Physical Therapy at CB South Sunset Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 7-8 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 7:30 a.m. AA/Alanon Open at UCC. 349-5711.
• 8 a.m.  Motherhood Movement with Adventure Physical Therapy at CB South Sunset Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 9 a.m. Historic Walking Tour of Crested Butte. Leaves from the Crested Butte Heritage Museum. 349-1880.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Gunnison County branch office is open at the Crested Butte Town Offices, 507 Maroon Ave.
• 10-11 a.m. Power Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10 a.m.-noon Discovering Personal Symbols at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 11:30 a.m. League of Women Voters meeting at 210 W. Spencer in Gunnison.
• noon AA Closed at UCC.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunch Break Athletic Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 12:30-1:30 p.m. Therapeutic Yoga at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 1:30-3:30 p.m. Tech Tuesdays at Old Rock Library. 349-6535.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage. 300 Belleview, Unit 2. Free clothing & bedding.
970-318-6826.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion Service at Queen of All Saints Church.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:45 p.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-8 p.m. Figure Drawing Sessions with a live model in Downtown Crested Butte. 349-7228.
• 6-8 p.m. Pick-up Adult Soccer at Town Park.
• 6:30-7:45 p.m. Gentle Restorative Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7 p.m. Alanon meeting at the Last Resort.
• 7-8 p.m. Movement & Meditation at Yoga For The Peaceful. 349-0302.
• 7-8 p.m. Aerial Conditioning with the Crested Butte Dance Collective at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 7-8:30 p.m. Blessing Way Circle support group at Sopris Women’s Clinic. 720-217-3843.
• 7:45-9:45 p.m. Drop-in Adult Volleyball, CBCS MS Gym.

WEDNESDAY 3
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30 a.m. The Crested Butte / Mt. Crested Butte Rotary Club breakfast meeting in the Shavano Conference Room at the Elevation Hotel.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 8:30 a.m. Hike with HCCA. Sign up at hccacb.org.
• 8:45 a.m. Pilates at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Inversions and Backbends / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Two Buttes Senior Citizens van transportation. Roundtrip to Gunnison. Weather permitting. Call first for schedule and availability. 275-4768.
• 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Middle School Art Sessions: Mixed Media Altered Photographs (through Thursday, August 4) at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunch Break Blend Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• noon-1 p.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 12:30-1:30 p.m. Yoga Outside at Totem Pole Park with Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 2:30 p.m. Easy Stretch & Relax with Adventure Physical Therapy in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 3:30 p.m. Motherhood Movement with Adventure Physical Therapy in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. 970-251-5098.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5 p.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30 p.m. Prenatal Yoga class in Crested Butte South. 349-1209.
• 5:45 p.m. Boot Camp Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Give Back Yoga at Yoga For The Peaceful benefitting Adaptive Sports Center.
• 6:30-8 p.m. Restorative Yin-Yoga-Nidra / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7-9 p.m. “GriefShare,” a grief recovery seminar and support group, meets at Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, 711 N. Main St., Gunnison. 970-349-7769.
• 7:30 p.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back). 349-6482.

 

Kid’s Calendar:

THURSDAY 28
• 9 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class in the High Attitude Dance Academy in Gunnison.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 3-8 p.m. Youth Gymnastics, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall 349-5338.

FRIDAY 29
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 11 a.m. Big Kids Storytime for ages 3-7 at Old Rock Library.
• 3-3:45 p.m. Kid’s Yoga (ages 4-9) with Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 4-5 p.m. Tang Soo Do Martial Arts classes for youth with West Elk Martial Arts, Town Hall Fitness Room. 901-7417.

MONDAY 1
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Advanced Art for ages 9-11 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-5 p.m. CB’s Rockin’ Music School for Kids with the Center for the Arts. 349-7487. (runs through Friday, August 5)
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.

TUESDAY 2
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Advanced art for ages 9-11 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. • 11 a.m. Romp & Rhyme Storytime for families and kids of all ages at Old Rock Library.
• 3-8 p.m. Youth Gymnastics, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall 349-5338.

WEDNESDAY 3
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Advanced Science for ages 8-11 at The Trailhead.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. • 11 a.m. Babies and Toddlers Storytime at Old Rock Library.
• 3:45-4:45 p.m. Tween Scene (ages 8-12) at the Old Rock Library.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.

 

Events & Entertainment:

THURSDAY 28
Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival runs through July 31.
• 2 p.m. Novel Tea: Let’s Pretend This Never Happened at the Old Rock Library.
• 2-4 p.m. Croquet & Wine Festival Kick-Off with the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival. 349-7487.
• 4-6:30 p.m. Canvases & Cabernets with the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival. 349-7487.
• 6-9 p.m. Canvas & Cocktails at the Gunnison Arts Center. 641-4029.
• 7 p.m. Bill Dowell plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7-8 p.m. Art chat with River Light Gallery owner Michael Mahoney, discussing Rembrandt.
• 7-9 p.m. Crested Butte Film Festival: City of Gold with the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival. 349-7487.
• 7:30 p.m. Gunnison Valley Health Foundation presents Wynonna & the Big Noise at the I Bar Ranch.
• 8 p.m. Ladies Night at the Red Room.
• 10 p.m. Liver Down the River plays at the Eldo.
• 10 p.m. Karaoke upstairs in the Sky Bar at the Talk of the Town.

FRIDAY 29
• 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Eat. Drink. Think. with the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival. 349-7487.
• 2:30-4:30 p.m. Art & Wine Walk of the Town with the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival. 349-7487.
• 4:30 p.m. Free Twilight Archery Series: Sitka 3D Fridays at CBMR. Check in at Jefe’s.
• 5-6:30 p.m. Eat. Drink. Think. with the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 7 p.m. Tyler Hansen plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7 p.m. Evelyn Roper and Sean Turner plays at the Talk of the Town.
• 7:30 p.m. Open Mic and Art Show at RMBL.
• 7:30 p.m. Crested Butte Mountain Theatre presents opening night for Pippin.
• 7:30-9:30 p.m. Jeremy Armstrong Artist Reception at the Piper Gallery of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 8 p.m. Karaoke with DJ Triple L at the Red Room.
• 10 p.m. Mostest with Toast play at the Eldo.

SATURDAY 30
• 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Ghostoric Walk of the Town with the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival. 349-7487.
• 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Let’s Hike! Beg / Int Wine Hike & Picnic Lunch with the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival. 349-7487.
• 3-6:30 p.m. Grand Tasting with the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival. 349-7487.
• 4-6 p.m. National Dance Day Tutu Dance Party on the Alpenglow Field.
• 6-8 p.m. Rosalind Cook’s artist opening at River Light Gallery.
• 6-9 p.m. Gypsy Jazz Social Club plays at Montanya Distillers.
• 7 p.m. Craig McLaughlin plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7-9 p.m. Crested Butte Film Festival: The Hundred-Foot Journey with the Crested Butte Wine & Food Festival. 349-7487.
• 7:30 p.m. Crested Butte Mountain Theatre presents Pippin.
• 9 p.m.-midnight Townie Books will host a midnight release party for J.K. Rowling’s newest book Harry Potter and the Cursed Child.
• 10 p.m. Jelly Bread plays at the Eldo.

SUNDAY 31
• 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Eat. Drink. Think.: Butchering Demonstrations with the CB Wine & Food Festival. at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 2-6 p.m. Happy Hour with Chuck Grossman at the Eldo.
• 4 p.m. Crested Butte Mountain Theatre presents Pippin.
• 7 p.m. Rachel VanSlyke plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 8 p.m. We Dream Dawn plays at the Center for the Arts.

MONDAY 1
• 9 a.m. Join the Gunnison Public Lands Initiative, Crested Butte Mountain Association and Gunnison Trails on a free, guided mountain bike ride on the Teocalli Ridge Trail, meet at the 4-way stop.
• 5:30 p.m. Alpenglow: Billy Iuso & the Restless Natives at the Center for the Arts Outdoor Stage.
• 7 p.m. The Icy Mitts play at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7:30 p.m. “The History of the Environmental Movement” with Dr. Doug La Follette at RMBL.

TUESDAY 2
• 4-6 p.m. Canvases & Cocktails at Bonez with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 6-8 p.m. Adele Bachman Artist Reception at the Piper Gallery of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 6:30 p.m. Hot Texas Swing Band plays Burgers & Brews at the I Bar Ranch.
• 7 p.m. Chuck Grossman plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7:30 p.m. “Bees and Bacteria” with Dr. Nancy Moran at RMBL.

WEDNESDAY 3
• 4 p.m. gOgirl Ride, meet at Chopwood Mercantile.
• 5:30 p.m. Peter Rowan with Slocan Ramblers play Live! From Mt. Crested Butte at the Red Lady Stage at CBMR.
• 6:30-8 p.m. Life Vision Workshop at the Old Rock Library.
• 7 p.m. Evelyn Roper plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7:30 p.m. Crested Butte Mountain Theatre presents Pippin.
• 7:30 p.m. Pool tournament upstairs at the Talk of the Town.

Community Calendar: Thursday, July 21–Wednesday, July 27

THURSDAY 21
• 6:15-7:15 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Foundations for Alignment / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8 a.m. Ecumenical Meditation at UCC.
• 8:30 a.m. Women’s book discussion group at UCC.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9 a.m. Historic Walking Tour of Crested Butte. Leaves from the Crested Butte Heritage Museum. 349-1880.
• 9-10 a.m. Yoga for Everyone with Yoga For The Peaceful at the Center for the Arts Outdoor Stage. 349-7487.
• 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Summer Science Tour: From Shoots to Roots: Tracking the Building Block of Life within Alpine Meadows with Dr. Lara Souza at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory Visitor Center. 349-7156.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Gunnison County Branch Office is open at the Crested Butte Town Offices.
• 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Weekly Sketching Series with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 11:30 p.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• noon All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Church Community Healing Service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• noon-1 p.m. Shoulders, Knees and Feet Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 12:30-1:30 p.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 3-6 p.m. Coloring Wildflowers, Sound Currents and Tea Time! with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage. 300 Belleview, Unit 2. Free clothing and bedding. 970-318-6826.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:30-8:30 p.m. Silversmithing I at the Center for the Arts. 349-7044. (Six week class runs through August 11).
• 5:45 p.m. World Dance Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-8 p.m. Pick-up Adult Soccer at Town Park.
• 6-9 p.m. Canvas & Cocktails at the Gunnison Arts Center. 641-4029.
• 6:30 p.m. AA Open Meditation at UCC.
• 7 p.m. Women Supporting Women Group Discussion at the Nordic Inn.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.

FRIDAY 22
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7-8:30 a.m. Mysore Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7:30 a.m. Barre Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8-9 a.m. Aerial Conditioning with the Crested Butte Dance Collective at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 8:30 a.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back). 349-6482.
• 8:45 a.m. Core Power Yoga Class at the Pump Room.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Yoga for the Flexibly Challenged / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9 a.m.-noon Open Wheel Throwing at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Wildflower Art Journal Immersion (through July 23) with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Painting Petals in Paradise with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunch Break Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• noon-1:15 p.m. Restorative Yoga at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 5-7 p.m. Crested Butte Tennis Club Social Mixer at the Town Tennis Courts. (weather permitting)
• 5:30 p.m. Communion service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 6-7 p.m. Poi Playshop at the Pump Room.
• 7-9 p.m. Pick-up adult Karate, Fitness Room at Town Hall.

SATURDAY 23
• 7:30 a.m. Open AA at UCC.
• 8 a.m. 30/30 Indoor Cycling Weight Circuit Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Precious Metal Clay (PMC) Jewelry Making at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Vinyasa Flow with Inversions / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Community Yoga at the Sanctuary Yoga & Pilates Studio, Gunnison.
• 10-11 a.m. Hip Hop Community Dance Class at the Pump Room (above Fire House on 3rd & Maroon). 415-225-5300.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 10:30 a.m.-noon St. Mary’s Garage. 300 Belleview, Unit 2. Free clothing and bedding. 970-318-6826.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 1-3 p.m. Summer Knitting classes at Kasala Gallery. 970-251-5055.
• 6:30-7:30 p.m. Guided Sound Meditiation at 405 4th Street.

SUNDAY 24
• 7-8 a.m. Meditation at Yoga For The Peaceful, by donation.
• 8:30 a.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 8:30 a.m. Worship Service at Oh-Be-Joyful Church.
• 9 a.m. Worship Service at Union Congretional Church. 349-6405.
• 9-10:15 a.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9:30-11 a.m. Community Free Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10 a.m.-noon Mandalas for Mindfulness at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 10 a.m. Worship Service at Oh-Be-Joyful Church.
• 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Crested Butte Farmer’s Market and Art Market on Elk Avenue.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 1-2 p.m. Zumba class with Barron Farnell at the Pump Room.
• 4-5 p.m. African Drum Class with Laine Ludwig at the Pump Room. 970-275-0067.
• 4-5:15 p.m. CBCYC Community Book Club at 405 4th Street.
• 5-6 p.m. All Saints in the Mountain Episcopal Eucharist at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church. 349-9371.
• 5-7 p.m. Pick-up Adult Basketball. HS Gym, CBCS.
• 5:15-6:45 p.m. African Dance Class with Angela Carroll at the Pump Room. 970-596-8385.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 6 p.m. AA meets at UCC.
• 6-8 p.m. Pick-up Adult Soccer at Town Park.
• 6:30 p.m. Duplicate Bridge at UCC. 349-1008.
• 7 p.m. Gamblers Anonymous meets at the Last Resort.

MONDAY 25
• 7 a.m. Cardio Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Community Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Pranayama & Namaskar / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 8-9 a.m. Open Aerial Dance with the Crested Butte Dance Collective at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 8:45 a.m. Mat Mix at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa Flow / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For the Peaceful.
• 9-11 a.m. Summer Knitting classes at Kasala Gallery. 970-251-5055.
• 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Plein Air Watercolor Workshop Series with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• noon-1 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunch Break Vinyasa Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion service at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Yin Yoga Nidra at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:30-7 p.m. Moms in Motion class at the GVH rehab gym.
• 6:30-8 p.m. Women’s Domestic Violence Support Group at Project Hope. Childcare available upon request. 641-2712.
• 7:30 p.m. Open AA at UCC. 349-5711.
• 7:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at 114 N. Wisconsin St. in Gunnison.

TUESDAY 26
• 6-7 a.m. Meditation at Yoga For The Peaceful, by donation.
• 7 a.m. Core Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7-8 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 7:30 a.m. AA/Alanon Open at UCC. 349-5711.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Vinyasa at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 9 a.m. Historic Walking Tour of Crested Butte. Leaves from the Crested Butte Heritage Museum. 349-1880.
• 9 a.m.-noon Exploring Nature and the Photographer’s Creative Vision at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Gunnison County branch office is open at the Crested Butte Town Offices, 507 Maroon Ave.
• 10-11 a.m. Power Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 10:30-11:45 a.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga for the Peaceful.
• 11:30 a.m. League of Women Voters meeting at 210 W. Spencer in Gunnison.
• noon AA Closed at UCC.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunch Break Athletic Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 12:30-1:30 p.m. Therapeutic Yoga at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 1:30-3:30 p.m. Tech Tuesdays at Old Rock Library. 349-6535.
• 4-5:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Garage. 300 Belleview, Unit 2. Free clothing & bedding.
970-318-6826.
• 4-6 p.m. Canvases & Cocktails at Bonez with the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 5:30 p.m. Communion Service at Queen of All Saints Church.
• 5:30-6:45 p.m. Slow Flow at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 5:45 p.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-8 p.m. Figure Drawing Sessions with a live model in Downtown Crested Butte. 349-7228.
• 6-8 p.m. Pick-up Adult Soccer at Town Park.
• 6:30-7:45 p.m. Gentle Restorative Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7 p.m. Alanon meeting at the Last Resort.
• 7-8 p.m. Movement & Meditation at Yoga For The Peaceful. 349-0302.
• 7-8 p.m. Aerial Conditioning with the Crested Butte Dance Collective at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 7-8:30 p.m. Blessing Way Circle support group at Sopris Women’s Clinic. 720-217-3843.
• 7:45-9:45 p.m. Drop-in Adult Volleyball, CBCS MS Gym.

WEDNESDAY 27
• 6:30 a.m. All Levels Iyengar Yoga Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 7:30 a.m. The Crested Butte / Mt. Crested Butte Rotary Club breakfast meeting in the Shavano Conference Room at the Elevation Hotel.
• 7:30-8:30 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 8:30 a.m. Hike with HCCA. Sign up at hccacb.org.
• 8:45 a.m. Pilates at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 8:45-10 a.m. Inversions and Backbends / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 9-10:30 a.m. Prana Vinyasa at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Two Buttes Senior Citizens van transportation. Roundtrip to Gunnison. Weather permitting. Call first for schedule and availability. 275-4768.
• 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Middle School Art Sessions: Woodworking (through Thursday, July 28) at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• noon Closed AA at UCC.
• noon-1 p.m. Lunch Break Blend Yoga / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• noon-1 p.m. Yoga Basics at Yoga For The Peaceful.
• noon-5 p.m. Paint Your Own Pottery at the Art Studio of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 12:30-1:30 p.m. Yoga Outside at Totem Pole Park with Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 5 p.m. Mass at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church.
• 5:30 p.m. Prenatal Yoga class in Crested Butte South. 349-1209.
• 5:45 p.m. Boot Camp Class at The Gym. 349-2588.
• 6-7:15 p.m. Give Back Yoga at Yoga For The Peaceful benefitting High Country Conservation Advocates.
• 6:30-8 p.m. Restorative Yin-Yoga-Nidra / CB Co-op at Town Hall.
• 7-9 p.m. “GriefShare,” a grief recovery seminar and support group, meets at Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, 711 N. Main St., Gunnison. 970-349-7769.
• 7:30 p.m. Alanon at UCC Parlour (in back). 349-6482.

Kid’s Calendar

THURSDAY 21
• 9 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class in the High Attitude Dance Academy in Gunnison.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 3-8 p.m. Youth Gymnastics, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall 349-5338.

FRIDAY 22
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 11 a.m. Big Kids Storytime for ages 3-7 at Old Rock Library.
• 3-3:45 p.m. Kid’s Yoga (ages 4-9) with Yoga For The Peaceful.
• 4-5 p.m. Tang Soo Do Martial Arts classes for youth with West Elk Martial Arts, Town Hall Fitness Room. 901-7417.

MONDAY 25
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Advanced Art for ages 9-11 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.

TUESDAY 26
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Advanced art for ages 9-11 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. • 11 a.m. Romp & Rhyme Storytime for families and kids of all ages at Old Rock Library.
• 3-8 p.m. Youth Gymnastics, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall 349-5338.

WEDNESDAY 27
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Advanced Science for ages 8-11 at The Trailhead.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Little Innovators Camp for ages 3-5 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Art and Science Camp for ages 5-8 at The Trailhead. 349-7160.
• 9:30 a.m. Munchkin’s Music & Dance Class in the Fitness Room at Town Hall. • 11 a.m. Babies and Toddlers Storytime at Old Rock Library.
• 3:45-4:45 p.m. Tween Scene (ages 8-12) at the Old Rock Library.
• 4-7:30 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for children and adults with West Elk Martial Arts, Jerry’s Gym at Town Hall. 901-7417.
• 4:45 p.m. Tang Soo Do classes for juniors at Town Hall. 901-7417.

Events & Entertainment

THURSDAY 21
17th Annual Writing the Rockies Conference runs through July 24. 943-2058.
• 11 a.m.- 1 p.m. Local Author Wildflower Week Signing with Fae Davidson at Townie Books. 349-7545.
• 7 p.m. Renee Wright and Nichole Reycraft play at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7 p.m. Crested Butte Film Festival Monthly Film Series: Janis: Little Girl Blue. 303-204-9080.
• 7-8 p.m. Michael Mahoney of River Light Gallery will be sketching and speaking about Leonardo da Vinci.
• 7:30 p.m. 14th Annual Friends of NRA Banquet at the Gunnison Rodeo Grounds. Doors open at 6 p.m.
• 7:30 p.m. The Subdudes play at the
I Bar Ranch.
• 8 p.m. Ladies Night at the Red Room.
• 10 p.m. Karaoke upstairs in the Sky Bar at the Talk of the Town.

FRIDAY 22
• 11 a.m.- 1 p.m. Local Author Wildflower Week Signings with Fae Davidson and Briana Wiles at Townie Books. 349-7545.
• 3:30-4:30 p.m. Jim Wodark artist reception at the Oh Be Joyful Gallery. Exhibition July 20-July 31. 349-5936.
• 4:30-5:15 p.m. Registration at Jefe’s for Sitka® 3D Fridays, free twilight archery series at CBMR with after party at Jefe’s.
• 5:30-7:30 p.m. Judith Cassel-Mamet Artist Reception at the Piper Gallery of the Center for the Arts. 349-7044.
• 6 p.m. Townie Takeover in support of the proposed bag ban in Crested Butte starting at Totem Pole Park.
• 7 p.m. Dawne Belloise and Chuck Grossman play at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7:30 p.m. Local Vocals Concert in the Black Box Theater at the Gunnison Arts Center. Doors open at 7 p.m.
• 8 p.m. Comedy Night with Aaron Urist at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 8 p.m. Karaoke with DJ Triple L at the Red Room.
• 10 p.m. Gaslight Street plays at the Eldo.

SATURDAY 23
• 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Summit Hike to benefit Living Journeys.
• 2-4 p.m. Artist Demonstration by Jim Wodark at the Oh Be Joyful Gallery. 349-5936.
• 7 p.m. Monthly Film: Janis: Little Girl Blue at the Gunnison Arts Center.
• 7 p.m. Craig McLaughlin plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 8 p.m. Due West at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.
• 10 p.m. Dave Jordan and the NIA plays at the Eldo.

SUNDAY 24
• 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Art in the Park at Legion Park in Gunnison.
• 2 p.m. Happy Hour Sundays with Chuck Grossman at the Eldo.
• 5 p.m. High Country Conservation Advocates Environmental Possibilities Series: “Healthy Environment vs. Healthy Economy: Which is more important?” with Luke Danielson at the Guild.
• 7 p.m. Casey Mae and Tyler Lucas play at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7:30 p.m. Arts in Elevation – Elaine Kwon & Friends at the Center for the Arts. 349-7487.

MONDAY 25
• 5:30 p.m. Alpenglow: Roosevelt Dime at the Center for the Arts Outdoor Stage.
• 7 p.m. The Icy Mitts play at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 10 p.m. Open Mic Night at the Eldo.

TUESDAY 26
• 9 a.m. Socrates Café: “Can betrayal ever be justified?” at the Old Rock Library.
• 6:30 p.m. Burgers & Brews: Rapid Grass plays at the I Bar Ranch. Doors open at 5 p.m.
• 6:30-7:20 p.m. Free Community Class for National Dance Day with the School of Dance, all ages.
• 7 p.m. “Mesa, Mountains and Canyons” with WSCU professor Bruce Bartleson at the Old Rock Library.
• 7 p.m. Chuck Grossman plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7:30 p.m. Crested Butte Mountain Theatre presents Pippin.

WEDNESDAY 27
• 5 p.m. gO Pinnacle Series Race #5 at CBMR.
• 5:30 p.m. The Black Lillies play Live! From Mt. Crested Butte at the Red Lady Stage at CBMR.
• 7 p.m. Evelyn Roper plays at the Princess Wine Bar.
• 7:30 p.m. Crested Butte Mountain Theatre presents Pippin.
• 7:30 p.m. Science Festival Kickoff Event! in partnership with the Public Policy Forum: “Translating Conservation Science into Public Policy” with Brian McPeek at the Center for the Arts.
• 7:30 p.m. Pool tournament upstairs at the Talk of the Town.

Pair with local ties to make film about Crested Butte

Looking for community support and input

By Alissa Johnson

As a child growing up in Taos, N.M., Conor Hagen listened to his parents tell stories about his birthplace, Crested Butte. He lived in town for three years and moved away at a young age, and he was transfixed by his parents’ tales of the mountain town and its transformation from a mining community to a ski town.

“These stories always bewildered me and showed me that there was a more interesting way to live life than the standard norm,” Conor said. “People would come to Crested Butte, and they just sort of did whatever they wanted. They had freedom and the independence to lead the lives they wanted to, and out of that emerged a community of people who were thick as thieves and didn’t favor things like greed. They favored things like community and friendship.”

A filmmaker whose work has screened at festivals across the country, Conor has always wanted to make a film about that era in Crested Butte, telling its stories and also examining the alternative subculture that grew out of the 1960s and ’70s. He has, in fact, already made a film about Crested Butte, BEYOND MIDNIGHT: The Grand Traverse, which tells the story of the 40-mile backcountry race that leaves Crested Butte at 12 a.m. and heads to Aspen.

Enter Alison Batwin (Ali), who has produced films around the world, from Prague to San Francisco, and the new film project began to take shape. She has been coming to Crested Butte with her family for 15 years and was hooked by Conor’s vision.

“I’ve worked in film all over the world, and I’m always looking for a project that means a lot to me,” she said.

The pair founded Red Lady Films, and they are now fundraising and connecting with local characters who were part of Crested Butte during the ’60s and ’70s. It will come as no surprise to locals that the trailer for the project features the likes of history buff Duane Vandenbusche and longtime local George Reinhardt.

The pair has also made connections with the growing Crested Butte Film Festival and the Crested Butte Heritage Museum. The latter has provided them with access to its historical records and artifacts, and is also acting as Red Lady Films’ fiscal sponsor. Donors can contribute to the project through the museum and have their donation be tax deductible.

“They are super supportive, both the previous director [Glo Cunningham] and now Shelley [Popke]. They really believe in our mission,” Ali said.

“The Crested Butte Mountain Heritage Museum is excited to be working with Red Lady Films on this documentary. Our partnership is a wonderful way to advance the Museum’s mission ‘to preserve and share the uniquely diverse cultural history of the Gunnison Valley. We make the past a living part of the future,’” said museum director Shelley Popke.

Ali and Conor expect to complete fundraising this summer and into the fall, with filming starting this winter and into next summer. In addition to raising funds, they hope to connect with locals who are interested in the project, have archival materials like film or photos, or have stories relevant to the project.

“We’re really trying to utilize a lot of archival assets. It’s going to make the film so much richer, so…, hopefully they’ll come forth and lend us some of their resources. Someone could have a reel of 8mm film from 1965 hidden away on a shelf,” Conor said.

He admits that there is a nostalgic component to the project—he has always loved the attitudes and the mentalities of the ’60s, including the music and the sort of reckless abandon. It provides an interesting contrast to what he sees going on now.

“It’s technology and progress and development, and most of our communities are online. I feel like I’m somewhat radical in my feelings about this; while I also feel technology is good, we’re constantly moving away from solid, strong, communities that are human and integrated and more toward these communities that are more disparate and based on some sort of digital community. It doesn’t feel as authentic,” he said.

At the same time, however, he’s careful to point out that he and Ali are not naïve or placing the ideals of the ’60s on a pedestal. They know that the same people who helped transform Crested Butte during the ’60s and ’70s and eschewed greed had to and wanted to make money in some form. Many went on to become entrepreneurs and business owners and raise families. Yet at the same time, they made decisions about the town and the natural environment to preserve the character of Crested Butte. That included disallowing conglomerates and corporations, and protecting the natural environment.

“That’s also part of story we want to tell, to start with the transition from miners to Crested Butte becoming a ski town, and then, how does one walk the line between progress and development, and maintaining the culture that is Crested Butte,” Conor said.

In many ways, that same question is being asked today as Crested Butte manages the growth of tourism, exposure from events like Whatever, USA, and maintaining the feel of the town and the backcountry at the same time.

“There is a conversation going on in Crested Butte right now but also everywhere. We want to be sure to relate this film to a larger audience and tell the bigger story too, because it is a conversation happening everywhere,” Conor said.

While Hagan is currently based in San Francisco and Ali in Boulder, the pair return to Crested Butte frequently and were just in town over the 4th of July weekend. To make the film a reality, they’ll be returning to town often and are open to traveling wherever they need to go in order to conduct the interviews that will make the film richer.

As Ali pointed out, they plan to travel to Florida if it makes it possible to connect with Dick Eflan, a founder of the local ski resort who now lives in Florida. First, however, they’re looking for the community’s help, both through financial support and through ideas, footage, and photos. It’s that local participation that will make a film about Crested Butte truly representative of the town.

“Any footage we can get will be awesome and make that time come to life… We really feel that these stories are important to preserve an historical record,” Ali said.

Learn more about the project or connect with Ali and Conor at redladyfilms@gmail.com or redladyfilms.com. There, you’ll also find information about how to donate to the project, which can be done through the Crested Butte Heritage Museum website, crestedbuttemuseum.com.

Profile: Lisa Cramton

by Dawne Belloise

Lisa Cramton laughs about the common misspelling of her surname and quotes a sign she once saw at a swimming pool: “Welcome to our ool; notice there’s no ‘P’ in it and we’d like to keep it that way.” “No P in Cramton,” she reiterates with a smile and a jovial ambiance that’s characteristic of a life well lived.

Hailing from Oregon, Wisc. (pronounced Ore-gone), Lisa says the enunciation is kind of a joke among the locals. It’s an area steeped in dairy farms, about seven miles south of Madison, where 70 percent of her classmates came to school reeking of cows; then, there were the potheads and jocks woven into the demographics of the 160 kids in her high school.

Lisa was two years old when, she claims, her mom sold their souls at a horse auction when they fell in love with a three-year-old untrained Arabian stallion named Zee. The horse changed their lives as they bought 10 acres and began boarding horses and entering summer equestrian shows.

photo by Lydia Stern
photo by Lydia Stern

“We didn’t have a lot of money and we depended on Zee to win to get us home. And he usually won. He was always in the money,” Lisa says. She remembers with fondness those shows where she slept in the stall with Zee and her dad would make 7-Up pancakes and biscuits and gravy in the morning for all their friends attending the horse shows. “It was like being a carney, and that’s how I grew up.”

When Lisa graduated from high school in 1983, she was determined to be an athletic trainer. She figured if she wasn’t good enough to be an Olympic athlete she could help others to get there. Soccer was her passion, even though she started late as a high school sophomore and she was still learning the sport. When she attended the University of Wisconsin Madison (UW-Madison), she admits she wasn’t good enough to play for the college team but could play in the summer soccer league. Out of the blue, she decided one day to try out for team rowing.

“I walked in, took the physical tests for the crew team and they put me in a boat. They were picking girls who were six feet tall but who weren’t athletic. I was shorter [at 5 foot 8] but an actual athlete.”

In the end, it just wasn’t her thing and she left after two months. Her college classes were teaching her how to tape ankles and do electro-stimulation, rehab and recovery. “My claim to fame in school was that I had Chris Chelios and Tony Granato on two different tables at the same time, both getting electro-stimulated on their lower backs.” She proudly notes that Chelios went on to be the captain of the U.S. Olympic hockey team and the Chicago Blackhawks, and Granato played pro as well as coached the Avalanche. “They were big time and that’s where I was going. I wanted to help athletes be better athletes.”

But that path changed in Lisa’s junior year when she answered an enticing ad in her college paper: “Come see what a real ski area looks like.” She had been working at a ski shop throughout college and she bit—hook, line and sinker. “It was Crested Butte Mountain Resort’s [CBMR] student program, and they were offering people jobs, places to live and roommates… so my hand just shot up and I took my senior year off to come to Crested Butte for the winter of 1986 to ‘87. We got 40 days of snow that year. It was insane. I arrived with $50 in my pocket but my roommates took care of me. We lived at Chateaux and we spent every night at the Rafters spinning the big wheel for cheap drinks. If you lasted the entire season, CBMR gave you a $500 scholarship to go toward tuition, and back then that paid for a whole semester.”

Lisa recalls learning to ski on 195 cm. skis, long and skinny as was the style back then. Her boots were yellow racing Lange Tii. “I remember taking a ski lesson from Xavier Fane and all I got out of the lesson was that he wanted my boots.” She cracks up about the days you had to hike back to Phoenix Bowl; in fact, you had to hike everywhere because there were no Northface or Headwall lifts.

“I chased those guys around everywhere and that’s how I learned to ski. Back then, in the ‘80s,” Lisa reminisces, “this place was so real, so raw, I was just enamored by it. I couldn’t believe that I lived here. Everyone was so nice and wanted to show you why this place was so amazing and in your soul, so they shared it, invited you into their homes and we did everything together,” she says of her ski shop clan. “I knew I was going to stay here. This was it.”

Lisa would return to Wisconsin during the off-seasons to once again work in the ski and sport shop. Off-seasons back then were much longer, lasting from early April when the lifts closed to the Fourth of July. CBMR had an Alpine Family Summer Program where families would come for a week for various summer activities like rafting, hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding.

“I guided those families’ activities and if there weren’t enough families booking, I ran the burger stand at the top of the Silver Queen lift. The summer of ‘87 was my first summer here and my first mountain bike experience, and mountain biking was just getting rolling.” She spent the following two summers in Tincup as a camp counselor for Timberline Trails helping learning-disabled kids. She’s one of the few who, in her 25 years in Crested Butte, has had a total of only six jobs and has lived in a total of four places. She considers herself to be very lucky. She advanced from the job at the CBMR rental ski shop into their property sales manager, booking group condos.

Returning from an Alaskan summer adventure in 2001 where she built trails for International Mountain Bike Association (IMBA), she worked as manager at Cucina’s, a local favorite gourmet take-out. After five years, she chuckles, they were cursed with success and exhausted. “So we closed it. It’s nuts because people are still bitching about us being closed.”

Knowing they were going to close Cucina’s, Lisa applied for and got hired as store manager at the Alpineer. Travis Underwood had bought the store in 2006 after Mike Martin’s tragic death in a plane crash. Since Lisa and Travis were both from the Midwest, actually growing up only an hour apart, they were instant friends, and later, they began dating. Travis sold the Alpineer in the spring of 2010 and after 25 years in Crested Butte, Lisa moved to Los Angeles with Travis, her future hubby. She worked for a mountain bike company in L.A. Travis determined that if they were going to live in the City of Angels, they’d have to live by the beach, eat well and go hear good music. “And we did all of those things because he knew he was taking me away from my home. We saw the English Beat, Social Distortion several times, and Ladytron,” she said of just some of the shows they went to. “We really tried to do it right. We traveled to New Zealand because it was easy out of L.A.”

Eventually, they ended up in Phoenix, where Travis had lived before he moved to Crested Butte. Lisa went to work for Pivot Cycles as assistant to the owner and they stayed in Phoenix for nine months until Travis got an opportunity in Moab. They again moved, with Lisa noting, “We moved a lot because nothing was right. We were trying things on. Trying to figure out where we fit. I was working at Western Spirit in Moab, which was owned by Mark Sevenoff. It’s 2012 and at the end of the summer we moved back to Phoenix, and our whole goal became how to get back to Crested Butte.”

The duo started talking to Jeff Hermanson about locations for a Patagonia concept store in downtown Denver. Hermanson said he had a space in Crested Butte opening up, but they knew how tight the housing crisis was and at the time Lisa took stock of her household and counted. “We had two horses, five dogs, and a potential mother-in-law who had also lived in Crested Butte previously and wanted to return.”

But they signed a lease on the Penelope’s building anyway and crossed their fingers. Within 24 hours the perfect house for them was posted as available through the Gunnison Marketplace page on Facebook. It was a horse property that Travis had previously looked into buying. They immediately called the owner, John Messner, who said he wanted to rent it to people with horses—so they moved in. “Everything fell into place for us to return to Crested Butte. It was a trip.”

The plan was to open their new shop, Chopwood Mercantile, by mid-May of 2015. And they did. The name Chopwood is taken from the Chinese proverb that teaches, “Before enlightenment—chop wood, carry water. After enlightenment—chop wood, carry water.” Lisa also points out there’s the saying “Chop wood, it warms you twice.” They added “Mercantile” because they felt it gave them the freedom to have whatever they wanted in the store.

“It’s outdoor lifestyle done differently,” Lisa explains. “The influence came from the surf shops we saw in southern California.” Although their shop is doing very well in its first year, Lisa still works remotely for Pivot Cycles as athlete coordinator and events. Her boss said she was the “touchy-feely” part of Pivot and he wasn’t ready to let her go. “I travel all over the country to events, bike festivals, and visiting our sponsored athletes and I love it… it’s my passion,” Lisa says of her second job.

“Crested Butte taught me how to work my ass off, to do whatever it took to survive and because I was willing to do whatever it took to stay here, I learned amazing values and work ethics which enabled me to get a job in the outside world that I never imagined that I could do,” she says, reflecting on the Crested Butte lifestyle of survival on many levels that the “outside” world doesn’t have to deal with, and the actuality of Buttians having to be jacks-of-all-trades.

“I was the marketing manager at one of the fastest growing mountain bike brands in the world, Pivot Cycles, and it was purely because I was willing to catch whatever balls were in the air that needed catching to make things happen. I was the first female employee besides the owner’s wife. So here I was one of the few women in the mountain bike industry, mostly because of my experiences in Crested Butte and being a part of the initial beginnings of mountain biking as a whole. Mountain biking—it all started in Crested Butte and I had the dream job all because of what I learned here.”

Lisa had coached kids skiing here and she’s loved watching those young rippers and her friends’ kids grow up, and the best part, she says, is “To me, there’s nothing better than watching those kids want to come back after college. That’s the impetus of this place. The kids want to come back. How awesome is that? I wanted to come back. Crested Butte gets into your soul. The people are beautiful and would do anything for you, even carry you through tough times. So why wouldn’t we come back? And now they’re carrying us through our new business, helping us to be successful.”

To return the favor, Chopwood Mercantile has a table with locally made art and goods, like Jamie’s Jerky, Gail Sovick’s map jewelry, Ivy McNulty’s horse hair jewelry, Mimi’s Bouchard’s coffee, Polly Oberosler’s hot sauce, Luke Mehall’s books, Valarie Jaquith’s soaps and potions, and more to come. “We want to give back to our community so we support our locals’ goods. We’re really proud to be back and have a store we worked really hard on.”

Short term havoc

by Olivia Lueckemeyer

In this two-part series we explore the recent phenomenon of short-term rentals, the effect on the community, and what town is doing to solve the prevailing issue. This week, we delve into the stories of locals who have both suffered and benefited at the hands of industry giants such as AirBnB and VRBO. 

Over 22 months, local event planner Heather Sengelmann moved seven times.

Her story starts like many others, with the February 2014 flooding and subsequent condemning of Mt. Crested Butte’s Marcellina apartment complex. After scrambling to find long-term housing with two roommates, Sengelmann decided to go out on her own, eventually resorting to living out of her car while crashing in a Gunnison basement. Once off-season rolled around, and the housing trail once again turned cold, Sengelmann headed home to San Antonio.

“Unfortunately, the housing shortage caused me to take whatever I could find and there were always multiple people looking at the rooms before the renter selected someone,” she recounted. “I went home for six weeks after that for off-season, not because I wanted to, but because I couldn’t find anything to rent before June.”

After the Marcellina apartments flooded, 44 units were deemed unfit for habitation, and with some units housing up to three tenants, a significant number of locals were displaced as a result of the mass eviction. The majority of tenants were young 20-somethings working in the service industry, so as a result, the market was inundated with millennials on the hunt for affordable housing. And although the housing shortage has been a problem for many years, this event heavily contributed to the current dilemma that is the Crested Butte housing crisis.

Sengelmann eventually returned to the valley and resumed her search in a cramped, expensive market. Temporary subleases were her fallback, but the imminent reality of having to pack up and move again was always on her mind.

“From there all I could find that I could afford were four- to five-month subleases before the original renter would come back and I’d be on to the next place,” she explained. “I always knew I was going to have to move again, but I was hopeful the next place would be more long term.”

Finally, in the summer of 2015, Sengelmann landed a one-year lease on the mountain in what used to be a vacation rental by owner (VRBO). And while she is grateful to have found long-term housing, she fears she might once again fall victim to the unpredictable whims of the housing market.

“We plan to renew for another year in October, but we have no idea yet if they will continue to long-term or turn it back into a VRBO,” Sengelmann said. “It’s been nice to settle into a place finally, but the idea of having to move again in a few months scares and worries me constantly.”

Like many communities across the United States, the phenomenon of short-term rentals (STR) has had a noticeable impact on the local housing market. Landlords and homeowners who used to rent long-term to locals now opt for the more profitable route of listing their properties on STR sites such as VRBO or AirBnB. As a result, during the slow seasons of Crested Butte, once-vibrant streets are now lined with vacant, unlit homes.

Kochevar’s bartender Alex Shelley lost his housing to a VRBO in June, just two weeks before he was supposed to renew his lease, forcing him to move for the fifth time in two years.

“We were going to renew our lease and were even told we could, and then the landlord, who has been really good to townies for a long time, kicked us out and the people below us,” Shelley explained. “He is turning it into a vacation rental, and because of that, six people lost their housing.”

Shelley is no stranger to the housing crisis. Last summer, he was homeless for three months after his landlord, who hoped to renovate and sell the property, refused to renew his lease. To this day, the house sits empty with a “for sale” sign in the front yard.

He eventually secured housing in the Columbine Condominiums, but it didn’t take long for lightning to strike twice. Due to construction plans, his lease was shortened by two months, so in anticipation of the inevitable, Shelley didn’t waste any time in securing backup accommodations.

“I didn’t want to get stuck with a bag in my hand, so the first place I found I started paying rent on,” Shelley said. “I was paying two rents at a time just to make sure I would have a place to live when the other one ended, because I didn’t want to get stuck homeless again.”

Of course, many landlords handle the transition to STRs in a more civil manner. Avalanche bartender Jill Wilkinson will also lose her housing to VRBO next May. Thankfully, her landlord gave her a year’s-worth of notice, allowing Wilkinson plenty of time to search for accommodations.

“My landlord has been great in giving me ample notice that this is his decision,” she explained. “I am definitely upset about the fact that I’m losing my place to live, but I am not surprised. I’ve felt this was inevitable due to the significant amount of short-term rentals that have been created in the past couple of years in Crested Butte…

“I do understand and respect his decision. He feels he will make more money short-term renting,” Wilkinson continued. “There is a large construction project that has to take place on the building sooner or later, and I believe he thinks short-term renting will be more helpful in funding the expensive upcoming project.”

As a bartender, Wilkinson has noticed the negative impact the housing shortage has had on the service industry. With fewer places to live, businesses are constantly short-staffed, causing them to lower their hiring standards.

“Staff is hard to find, and when you do find someone they may very likely be inexperienced or not invested in the job they’re hired for,” she explained.

The housing shortage has left a sour taste in the mouths of many locals, and for some, it’s enough to resort to the most drastic solution: leaving the valley altogether. Local artist Jesse Blumenthal has lived here for nine years, but soon he and his girlfriend will move to Montana. Loss of housing over a disagreement with his landlord concerning what constitutes “commercial work” when using the garage to produce art, as well as the bothersome construction of a VRBO in front of Blumenthal’s rented accessory dwelling, prompted a move to Gunnison, which hasn’t panned out the way he had hoped.

“The last search for housing a little over a year ago was very difficult,” he recalled. “It took us over six months to find the place we live in Gunnison. We wanted to stay in the Butte, where we’ve formed more of a community, but it just wasn’t possible.

“While my girlfriend and I are working down in Gunnison, we have decided it’s just not for us,” he continued. “The community is different, and in a lot of respects that’s nice, but after so long in the social environment of Crested Butte, it feels less like I live somewhere magical and more like I could be Anywhere West, U.S.A.”

Blumenthal, like many others, acknowledges that the town powers-that-be are working to find a solution, but change is not happening quickly enough—and meanwhile, long-term residents are being phased out.

“We live in a small place, and the physical limits are such that with inevitable growth, we are seeing gentrification that has hit the fan in the last two years,” Blumenthal said. “I don’t think anyone expected change to come so rapidly, but it is undeniable. The response from the town has not been as aggressive as the gentrification. They’re trying, but not affecting change as fast as the other groups of second-home owners, short-term renters, and location-less income workers.”

On the other side of the debate are long-time locals who are struggling just as hard to survive Crested Butte’s difficult economic landscape, but who happen to also own property. Crested Butte News feature writer and vocalist Dawne Belloise is using a room in her home as a source of additional income, because without it, living in Crested Butte would be impossible.

“Because there’s no way I can make it in Crested Butte on my income, I short-term my tiny downstairs bedroom,” Belloise explained. “The income I make from AirBnB allows me to pay my property taxes and pay down the exorbitant credit card bills I’ve racked up in daily living expenses because it’s so damned expensive to live here. Even when I was driving the bus 40 hours weekly and working on weekly profiles and features for the paper, I still couldn’t keep my head above water.

“Don’t get me wrong, I’m not complaining. I’ve chosen this life,” she continued. “This non-conforming lifestyle in a place that is so magnificent, you’ll do practically anything to stay here. Many locals short-terming their rooms or homes just need to make a decent wage, and local wages have never been comparable to the cost of living here.”

Stay tuned for Part 2 in next week’s issue, when we will delve into what the town is doing to tackle this pressing STR issue. 

TA made some strides last winter

Mt. CB support leads to “bright spots” in promotions

By Alissa Johnson

The challenge for the Gunnison-Crested Butte Tourism Association is well known: Summer is going well, and winter is more difficult when it comes to generating growth. But interactive marketing manager Laurel Runcie sees some bright spots in the picture, and she credits the Mt. Crested Butte Town Council with helping make them happen.

In an update to the council this summer, Runcie told councilmembers, “Summer went great last summer, and winter was more difficult, but the bright spots in our programming were all supported by Mt. Crested Butte funds. The work we did with your support was really big,” she said.

For the 2015-2016 ski season, Mt. Crested Butte awarded the TA $50,000 to help market the winter air program, $15,000 to film a Warren Miller video segment, and $20,000 to support the creation of a central reservations system. The funds were awarded through the town’s Admissions Tax Marketing Funds Grant Program.

Overall, the TA had set a goal of growing occupancy faster than its competitive set, which includes 18 mountain valleys, and ensuring a 70 percent load factor or higher for flights supported by a revenue guarantee from the Gunnison Valley Rural Transportation Authority—payments that go directly to airlines depending on how well a flight performs.

While there was some growth in occupancy in February, overall the Gunnison Valley fell back compared to its competitive set. Still, Runcie saw some successes during the winter, the most significant of which was the launch of an in-house travel agency, Gunnison Crested Butte Reservations.

“We exceeded our seasonal gross revenue goal by about 10 percent, so that was pretty phenomenal for a first-year program,” Runcie said. “We expected to lose $40,000 in our first year, and we only lost $20,400, so that was pretty fantastic.”

Runcie noted that those reservations generated $110,336 in room night revenues, and 72 percent of that revenue went to the north end of the valley. In addition, Gunnison Crested Butte Reservations sold 336 airline tickets, and 69 percent of air passengers booked lodging in the north, the majority of them staying in Mt. Crested Butte lodging.

Out of $362,771 in gross revenues, Runcie calculated that visitors spent approximately $15,560 on ski and snowboard rentals, $10,025 on ski lessons at Crested Butte Mountain Resort (CBMR) and $70,176 on lift tickets.

What stood out to Runcie the most about winter marketing efforts was that the TA and the in-house travel agency were far better at selling Crested Butte than outside entities. The TA partnered on special offers with Expedia.com and Ski.com, and they sold only 21 and 29 reservations, respectively.

“We’re convinced that [Gunnison Crested Butte Reservations] is necessary for the valley and to support the lodging community, so we will continue to subsidize it through LMD [Local Marketing District] funding as long as we need to,” Runcie said.

Runcie also told the council that the TA had gone through a brand building effort in Los Angeles, which became a new market after Alaska Airlines began to fly direct from L.A. to Gunnison. The TA produced a four-part video series that has more than 85,000 views on Facebook and another 7,000 on YouTube.

“We own those assets and will use them next winter. We are definitely targeting the more extreme demographic. We think that’s a real growth opportunity for us and we’re really targeting millennials,” Runcie said.

Millennials, Runcie noted, don’t plan ahead and often have to work during December, while their older and more established colleagues take time off. Looking ahead to next winter, that demographic could help boost January tourism. Runcie expects the video series to expand to Houston, Dallas and Chicago next year.

Finally, a Warren Miller video segment that featured skiing and fat biking also created some buzz and helped secure Fat Bike World Championships sponsor Borealis. “The real payoff from that will be in 2017. We’ll go on tour with CBMR and be part of the Warren Miller world tour,” Runcie said.

“Winters are tough, we all know that,” Runcie concluded, “But we learned a lot this past winter and we’re excited.”

Runcie noted that Mt. Crested Butte’s support of summer programs had been instrumental as well.

“You helped us launch a signage program last summer and this year we received $50,000 in funding from Colorado Parks and Wildlife that matches $60,000 from the LMD and the town of Crested Butte. We are putting in $110,000 worth of signs this summer. You helped us start that with the pilot program last year and it’s taken off,” she said.

On July 8, TA executive director John Norton told the Gunnison Valley Rural Transportation Authority that summer is looking good, and as far as summer flights, both Houston and Denver flights are filling up.

“We are talking about needs for winter,” he said. “And we are looking at Los Angeles with the Air Command and CBMR and coming to Mt. Crested Butte with a major, major program to promote the Alaska Air L.A service.

“We hope to crush that this year and expand the amount of flight days in the future,” he continued. “We think this is the year of L.A. and a year from now we will have a strong Alaska Air program in 2017-18 coming into the valley.”

Runcie told the Crested Butte News that support from local entities like Mt. Crested Butte and partnerships with entities like CBMR have been a big part of the TA’s recent successes. She credited CBMR with making Gunnison Crested Butte Reservations possible by allowing the TA to use their existing phone system—a high-cost, sophisticated system that allows phone numbers to be customized for the promotion. But the TA also partners with groups such as the RTA and the Gunnison/Crested Butte Chamber of Commerce.

“We’re a really small valley competing with much bigger ski resorts so it just makes sense for all of us to pool our resources,” she said.

Norton believes that kind of partnership goes one step further, supporting a broad spectrum of local entities. For example, “We met with the Nordic Council director and said ‘What can we do to help you?’ I guess the TA had never asked that question before.”

While the TA had promoted Nordic skiing, that conversation prompted the TA to change its support from advertising to offering prize money for the Alley Loop ski race. The TA also worked shoulder to shoulder with the Chamber on the Fat Bike World Championships and has supported events such as the Growler bike race.

For its part, the Mt. Crested Butte Town Council seemed appreciative of the TA’s efforts. Councilmember David O’Reilly credited the TA with getting creative, helping summer be great and winter improve.

Runcie responded, “I’d like it to be summer great and winter is great. That’s what we’re shooting for.”

Profile: Tully Burton

by Dawne Belloise

Tully Burton grabs a slice of pizza between phone calls, deliveries and the busyness of ongoing daily operations in his new restaurant and bar in Crested Butte South, named appropriately and deservingly, Tully’s. He’s a big guy with an even bigger smile and a lot more on his plate these days than pizza. But the restaurant is his dream, and he’s not only making it work, he’s living it and loving the challenges and rewards.

As the youngest of three brothers, and the self-proclaimed troublemaker, Tully may have gotten an early influence of restaurateur from his father, who managed an eatery where, as a kid, Tully would ace Pac-man while sipping a Shirley Temple. He grew up 17 miles north of Cincinnati in Green Hills, one of the greenbelt communities initiated by President Roosevelt in the 1940s as a self-sufficient town built to create jobs and economy. By the time he graduated from high school in 1999, Tully was enthralled with live music and traveling to concerts. He was also very gifted in a variety of mediums in art and was especially interested in architecture, which he put to use when he designed and drew up the elevations of his new building.

Photo by Lydia Stern
Photo by Lydia Stern

Immediately after high school, Tully was working odd jobs, trying to find a direction in life and enrolled in architecture courses at a community college. He later transferred to the University of Cincinnati but his friends were starting to move out of the area and he found himself wrapped up in wanderlust. One of his jobs was working for an entertainment company as a groundskeeper and the general go-to guy. It allowed him to see all the concerts and he could be backstage hobnobbing with the big-name artists. Being introduced to that kind of a scene at a young age triggered a desire to create something bigger, because after experiencing it from the perspective of a ground floor employee, he realized the complexity of production. “It’s not just that a person shows up and is on stage. It’s the coordination of what it takes to get to that point and get it done,” Tully grasped.

Tully’s love of music led him into the festival scene, and while he was enjoying the jam bands at the All Good Music Festival in West Virginia with 18,000 other partygoers, his van broke down, which turned into a life-changing event. He couldn’t leave so he signed up as a volunteer to do the massive after-fest clean up. He also noted that the variety of goodies you can find laying on the grounds after concerts like that can be a real bonus. He discovered that the company hired to organize the clean up, Clean Vibes, actually had contracts for several festivals so they had a core crew who not only got paid well, but were also provided with other stipends like hotel rooms, three meals a day, plane tickets, backstage passes and the opportunity to meet the performers.

At the time, Clean Vibes was new and inefficient, and it took a month for the 100 people they started out with to clean up the large acreage and farms where the festivals were held. Tully hired on with them and moved up to supervisor within the year. He stayed on for three summers before moving to San Francisco, feeling it was time to return to school.

Enrolled into the Community College of San Francisco, Tully was doubling up on art and business courses through scholarships and grants. He had a sweet deal with his art studio on the piers, looking out on the bay to the Golden Gate Bridge.

“I was doing more print making, getting into all the techniques, especially really old techniques, which are more interesting than Photoshopping,” he felt. But just as he was ready to begin his fourth year, California changed their funding parameters, and his tuition funding was cut completely. It was going to cost an exorbitant $40,000 just to finish that last year. It was a difficult decision, but he knew he couldn’t afford to spend that kind of money, so he packed up and left for Cincinnati, as a home base to return to work for Clean Vibes.

“I wanted to experience the city but cities are crazy and I was ready to get out. I got to know the underbelly and the scenes that tourists would never know, the heartbeat and life of the city,” he said of his time in San Francisco.

Back in Cincinnati, Tully was enjoying working for Clean Vibes. It was an easy life. During his first stint working for the company a few years prior, before the West Coast move, his work supervisor was Elise Meier, and they had a lovely fling but Tully admits he wasn’t interested in a long-term relationship since he had already decided to move to California. When he returned to Clean Vibes for the second time in 2006, the two reconnected while working at Bonnaroo.

“So, I’m at Bonnaroo in a short bus and rekindling our relationship, traveling to the different festivals doing cleaning up and at the end of that summer, Elise and I talked about what our plans were,” he smiles of “The Talk” couples eventually must engage in, and although he was planning to move to Asheville, Elise had been living in Crested Butte for a couple of years and told him it’s the only place she’d consider living, especially since she had just bought a house there.

“I had no idea where Crested Butte was. My dad’s family was all from Colorado but we only went to Rifle, once, to hunt. Elise hadn’t even moved into her house yet and was moving her stuff from Philadelphia.”

Tully drove into Crested Butte at night after flying in to Denver, so he didn’t catch even a glimpse of the mountains or breathtaking surroundings until he woke up the next morning and looked out his window from Crested Butte South up the valley and promised himself, “I’m never leaving! It was an amazing feeling. I’ve seen places all across the country and seeing Crested Butte relinquished the desire I had to travel. And still, to this day, every time I come around Round Mountain, I still feel the same.”

That was September 2006; he and Lisa have been together for 10 years now, and the really big news: the couple is expecting their first child early in October.

Tully’s first job here was managing the Crested Butte South General Store during the winter of 2006. It was busy and booming, he notes. The next summer he and Elise were still contracted to work the summer festival circuit with Clean Vibes, and returning in the fall, he had lined up a job at the Crested Butte Mountain Resort ski rental shop for that winter of 2007. Tully did the seasonal shuffle of being gone in the summer and back in the winter for four years through 2010.

He had never experienced a summer in Crested Butte until he starting working with Tyler Cappellucci’s Spring Creek Landscaping. He recalls hearing about the magnificent summers here and the valley was just starting to green when they were leaving for work with Clean Vibes. After finally spending an entire summer home, he was hooked—hiking, camping, rafting. “That clinched the deal,” he laughs. “Standing on top of a peak on the mountain made me feel that I had to figure out a way to never leave. It can be hard, it can be tough making a living, and there are sacrifices that you have to make but you make it work. You find a way.”

Winters now found him working at Red Mountain Liquors and back at the General Store where he was cooking, making the sandwiches and serving the Crested Butte South crowd. When the General Store closed its doors in the spring of 2011, Tully leased the building and went into business for himself that summer. He felt the economy was improving and he could make it work. He was carefully watching the trends and realized that the demands in Crested Butte South were increasing to the point that a grocery-convenience store, gas station, restaurant and bar in one location wasn’t what the down valley population needed.

He bought a commercial lot and broke ground on the summer solstice of 2015, opening Tully’s this April 2016. He smiles that as an owner you have to be prepared to be the cook, dishwasher, bartender, server, janitor and accountant. “You do it all when you own it,” he knows from experience.

And he’s grateful to the Crested Butte South community whose response and support have been overwhelming. “They’re enjoying it so much, along with the live music. It’s great. I’m here now with a dream and a goal that’s come true. It’s weird when they put up your name in lights,” he laughs about his new sign. “When I stepped back after the sign installers put it up I thought, ‘It’s game on!’”