After busy summer CBMR looks to prepare for winter ski season

Adventure Park, Bike Park use up over last year

By Alissa Johnson

The number of tourists in the north end of the valley is noticeably smaller than just a couple of weeks ago. School is right around the corner, and on the mountain, preparations are under way for winter. But there’s still time to make the most of summer at Crested Butte Mountain Resort (CBMR), where summer visitation at both the Evolution Bike Park and the Adventure Park was up over last year.

According to Erica Mueller, director of innovations and relations at CBMR, Adventure Park visitation is up 16 percent year over year (to date), and Evolution Bike Park visitation is up 10 percent. In addition, the number of scans for the bike park is up 13 percent. That’s promising for the resort, Mueller said, particularly given the community’s interest in mountain biking.

“[That] means riders are taking more laps each day they come out. This is something we have been focused on for the bike park to increase our attractiveness—building more trail to keep people riding longer and getting a full day out of their experience,” Mueller explained.

While summer activities like the Live! From Mt. Crested Butte concert series and Wednesday twilight lift rides are finished for the season, it’s not too late to enjoy summer on the mountain. Friday evening lift rides, which run through 7 p.m. for $7, will run through September 11.

The Evolution Bike Park, Adventure Park and other resort activities will be open daily until September 13, re-opening Friday through Sunday the weekends of September 18-20 and September 25-27. When the lifts stop running, trails will still be open to ride, but Mueller pointed out that mountain operations may be out at any time, prepping for the winter season. Riding will be at the rider’s own risk.

“Winter is on the horizon for us. We are fewer than 100 days until opening, so until opening day everyone on the team is doing their part to prepare for another awesome season,” Mueller said.

Staff has already been prepping snow-making equipment and doing some glading off of Bushwacker and toward the Red Lady Lift, and construction crews are finishing up the new Umbrella Bar at Ten Peaks and back-of-house renovations at Uley’s Cabin. (The latter is nothing that will be widely noticeable to the public, Mueller said, but will make operations more efficient with features like storage and walk-in cooler renovations.)

Off the slopes, promotions teams are also working on booking winter guests. Just passed is the first Book Early, Save Big deadline, which gave guests the opportunity to book four or more nights at resort properties and save 30 percent. Mueller says it’s too soon to know how the promotion performed, but visitors can still save 25 percent on four or more nights of lodging if they book their winter vacation by September 15.

Special offers are also available for airfare purchases made prior to September 15, including a $100 airfare credit for visitors who book a direct flight from Los Angeles and up to $150 for those who book a direct flight from Chicago, Dallas, or Houston. To qualify, visitors must also book lodging and lift tickets (full details are available at skicb.com).

And of course, there’s the October 9 deadline to purchase a season pass at its lowest price: $629 for adults, $419 for skiers and riders 70 and over, $315 for kids ages 13 to 17, and $209 for children 7 to 12. For rates for Peak Pass Plus—which includes access to Summer 2016 lift rides, the Adventure Park, tubing and other discounts—visit www.skicb.com/tickets-passes/season-tickets.)

If you need an incentive to get your pass now, when you purchase your Adult or Senior Peak or Peak Pass Plus by August 20, in addition to regular benefits you’ll receive two complimentary Summer 2015 Adventure Tickets good through September 13.

So while there may still be time to get in a few more (or several) good rides on the mountain, it seems it’s not too early to start thinking snow.

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